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Full text of "Annual report the Town of Dorchester, New Hampshire"



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TOWN OF 

DORCHESTER 





I 
I 




•II 



•II 



ANNUAL REPORT 
200S 



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•II 




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Town Hall Curtain 

Grange Advertising Curtain 
7/10/1940 by Marion Fracher 






2009 


2010 


JANUARY 


JULY 


JANUARY 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 


12 3 4 


1 2 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


5 6 7 8 9 1011 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


11 12 13 14 151617 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


10 11 12 13 141516 


18 19 20 21222324 


19 20 2122 232425 


17 18 19 20 212223 


25 26 27 28 293031 


26 27 28 29 3031 


24 25 26 27 282930 
31 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 121314 
15 16 17 18 192021 
22 23 24 25 262728 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 202122 
23 24 25 26 272829 


12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 111213 
14 15 1617 181920 
2122 23 24 252627 
28 




30 31 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 5 6 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


6 7 8 9 101112 


7 8 9 10 111213 


15 16 17 18 192021 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


14 15 16 17 181920 


22 23 24 25 262728 


20 2122 23 242526 


2122 23 24 252627 


29 30 31 


27 28 29 30 


28 29 30 31 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


12 3 4 


12 3 


12 3 


5 6 7 8 9 1011 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


11 12 13 14 151617 


11 12 1314 151617 


19 20 2122 232425 


18 19 20 21222324 


18 19 20 21222324 


26 27 28 29 30 


25 26 27 28 293031 


25 26 27 28 2930 


MAY 

1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 141516 
17 18 19 20 212223 
24 25 26 27 282930 
31 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 1112 131415 
16 17 18 19 202122 
23 24 25 26 272829 
30 31 


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 121314 
15 16 17 18 192021 
22 23 24 25 262728 
29 30 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


1 2 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 5 


7 8 9 10 111213 


6 7 8 9 101112 


6 7 8 9 101112 


14 15 16 17 181920 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


2122 23 24 252627 


20 21 22 23 242526 


20 2122 23 242526 


28 29 30 


27 28 29 30 31 


27 28 29 30 



ANNUM, REPORT 

OF THE 

OFFKHS 



^ 



OFIHETOWNOF 

DORCHESm N £ 



1 





Yeai Ended 
December 3 1,2008 



■1- 




Dedicated 

lo 

Henry am Melanson 




Henry "Hank" Melanson 

Tireless worker and Devoted member of 

the Dorchester Community 

Moderator ~ 1985-2008 

Member of Dorchester Grange #280 

One of the original founders of 

Dorchester Old Home Days 




-2- 




Wifli the help of Dorchester Grange #280 and a 

generous donation from long tune Dorchester 

resident and Grange member, Edgar "Junior" 

LaChance; the 1940 historic painted stage curtain 

was restored this year. 

The curtain was painted by Marion Fracher of 

Wentworth, NH, on July 10, 1940 and is believe to 

have hung in the Dorchester Town Hall ever since. 

The curtain sports cottages by a lake surrounded by 

various advertisements and a list of Past Masters of 

Dorchester Grange. 

Vistors and residents say that the scene reminds 

them of Reservoir Pond on the west side of town, but 

many curtains called "Historic Painted Scenery" were 

a conunon site in most Town Halls and Grange Halls 

during that period. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT 

2008 proved to be another year of positive economic structuring, 
protecting our ordinances, preparing for high-energy costs, keeping the 
tax rate contained to reduce its impact on citizens, setting a new direction 
on emergency management, and aggressively seeking private and public 
grants to preserve and build the Town's infrastructure. We now have a 
recessionary economy that is ripping at the very fabric of our nation, 
state, and all New Hampshire communities, thus necessitating aggressive 
action. 

For several years Dorchester was operating under the cloud of running a 
deficit. A deficit limits a town's growth, and gives it little room in which 
to control the tax rate. This year as last, due to unanticipated revenues 
from current use changes, tax sales, penalties, cost reimbursements, and 
fiscal discipline, Dorchester has increased the fiind balance significantly. 
We need to continue this economic trend by being ever so watchfiil of 
costs to continue with prudent fiscal planning and direction. Sometimes 
we have to encumber funds to economically position ourselves for fiscal 
growth. As the economic conditions deteriorate, we need to continue this 
course of action. 

The Selectmen's office not only serves as the fiscal regulator, but also as 
an enforcer of rules that were voted by our electorate. In the last decade, 
planning and land use have been in the forefront as two boards, the 
Planning Board and the Board of Adjustment, face new situations and 
challenges. Our community needs to support these boards because we 
as citizens voted the rules and regulations with the intent of protecting 
the community in which we live. Your input and suggestions are always 
welcome. 

A real area of encouragement is our aggressive pursuit of private 
and public grants via a contracted professional grant writer. There 
are numerous projects that the Town would like to undertake, but the 
financial costs would be too staggering for this community to absorb. 
The grant process would make these projects possible. We are applying 



-4- 



for grants to the historic district and town buildings, which would 
substantially upgrade our structures with full foundations, and provide 
space for town offices and recreational facilities. A second grant 
application is for the development of a public works infrastructure, which 
would include the purchase of land, buildings and equipment. The third 
area is to develop a new town cemetery that is prepared for year round 
burials. Please refer to the grant writers' report. 

As one sifts through the Town Budget, one should take note of a 
decrease and some increases for Government Buildings and Highways. 
To operate effectively and provide service, all these areas need to be 
adequately funded and state and federal disbursements accounted for 
through specified bookkeeping procedures. This year the Selectmen 
negotiated a decrease of $3,734.00 for our pro-rata share of the Rumney 
transfer station. Our commitment was decreased due to our receiving 
a 9.5% credit of the recycling revenues. This is a first and we hope to 
improve on this accounting plus in fiscal 2009. The Town Hall had 
renovations to its fi^ont doors in August of 2008 and the workmanship 
proved unsatisfactory. Due to this issue the invoice will not be 
encumbered or paid. A new craftsman, experienced in quality and 
historical reconstructions, will construct a new set of doors. To fund this 
work a withdrawal is planned from the Capital Reserve Fund for Town 
Buildings. The Road Budget is level funded but shows an increase 
over 2007. This is due to the Town having to show a gross budget that 
includes State Highway Block Grant and FEMA monies that have been 
received by the Town. The State accounting procedures through the 
Department of Revenue requires that we show these fiinds in our regular 
road budget and that they not be separated under another financial 
category. 

With the coming year we could experience sizable tax increases due 
to the inclusion of a new county prison, and increased levies from the 
Mascoma Valley Regional School District. The Grafton County Jail 
is not quite a reality. Its fate is in your hands and calls or letters to the 
Grafton County Commissioners could abate a sizable increase on the 
County tax rate. The Mascoma Valley Regional School District has 
worked with the five-town community by not attempting another bond 



issue due to the current economic conditions. It is also reacting to the 
possible cancellation and reduction of school aid for new construction. 
We applaud their commiserating with the plight of the towns in these 
difficult economic times. Nevertheless, their budget for 2009/2010, with 
accompanying Warrant articles, could cause an approximately 7.61% 
plus increase in the school budget. This could impact Dorchester by 
nearly $ 1.28 per thousand on the tax rate. These additional costs would 
all have to be absorbed by our already thin and static tax base. We urge 
all citizens to familiarize themselves with the Mascoma Valley Regional 
School District's annual report for details. 

Economically, we are in a recession, and it is getting worse. To cope 
with this monetary downturn we must be vigilant of all costs including 
special entitlements that could slowly erode town finances. During good 
times in the past, the Town has accommodated some of our citizens with 
altruistic measures voted by the community, as was the case last year 
with the passage of a maximized exemption for fully disabled veterans. 
2009 is not a good year to expand or continue with further entitlements 
that directly impact on the tax rate. Additionally, our State and Federal 
agencies and representatives need to exercise their responsibility 
for funding all entitlements rather than passing the costs to local 
communities. 

In the last few years Emergency Management has risen as one of the 
primary focuses of most NH communities. In the past, one of the 
Selectmen has assumed this duty. The responsibility has now been 
delegated to Mr. Arthur Burdette, a former assistant police chief from 
Freeport, NY, who brings with him a repertoire of knowledge and 
skills of emergency management procedures. Furthermore, in 2008 
Dorchester crafted its Emergency Operations Plan that will benefit all 
in manmade or natural disasters. This plan delineates a course of action 
and a responsibility continuum. With the adoption of the Emergency 
Operations Plan, the Town has also positioned itself to apply for a wide 
variety of federal and state grants. We wish to thank all the citizens who 
worked many hours for the creation of this important document for 
Emergency Management. 



-6- 



Also in 2008 Dorchester, along with the Upper Valley Lake Sunapee 
Regional Planning Commission, drafted the Town's first Hazard 
Mitigation Plan. The purpose of the plan is to allow the Town to apply 
for FEMA and other fiinds to upgrade and improve infrastructure that can 
abate damages both manmade and natural. In addition, the Town has on 
its Warrant an important article that addresses Floodplain Management 
for targeted areas. This article is a prerequisite for any Hazard Mitigation 
Grants. Please familiarize yourselves with this information that is 
available at the Town Offices. Again, we wish to thank all those who 
contributed to the creation of this necessary document. 

In conclusion, we would like to express our thanks to all who serve to 
make Dorchester's governmental structure function. The door is always 
open to new people and ideas that will benefit the total community. 

Respectfully, 

Albert J. Franz, Chairman 

John A. Cote 

David A. Conkey 

Dorchester Board of Selectmen 



pofckester Board of Sdectm, 




en 



John A. Cote David A. Conkey 

Albert John Franz 



DORCHESTER GRANTS 
2009-2010 

The Selectmen have enlisted the professional grant writers of 
Catelena Consulting, LLC in Canaan, NH to apply for grants both 
public and private to fund large ticket items that will benefit the 
Town's historic buildings and recreational facilities in the Historic 
District, Public Works, and the Town Cemeteries. It is our goal to 
have full foundations put under the Town Hall, the Church, and 
a partial crawl space foundation under the museum. With a full 
foundation under the hall, new town offices would be installed 
to centralize town government operations. A second grant is to 
improve the town's public works infrastructure. Targeted areas are 
the purchase of land for gravel and sand, the building of public 
works structures, creation of a town transfer station, and to upgrade 
highway equipment. The third grant is looking to preserve our 
town cemeteries and to provide for a new town cemetery to allow 
for year-round interments. 

We are excited about the possibilities of these grants and hope they 
can become a reality in 2009 and 2010. 

Dorchester Project 

Catelena Consulting & Grant Services, LLC was hired by the Town 
of Dorchester to assist with finding funding for the renovation 
and renewal of the historical district and to repair town roads and 
bridges. Catelena has been engaged in an extensive grant search 
process, including government and foundation grants. At this time, 
three funding requests to support hiring an architect/engineer to 
develop the project in greater detail have been submitted. We 
are awaiting responses and will continue to search for additional 
resources in the meantime. 



Sdednei's MeetiiMs 

m 

IhiRdaiis - i:30 PI 

January 8 ~ 22 
February 5-19 

March 5-19 

April 2-16-30 

May 14-28 

June 11-25 

July 9-23 

August 6-20 

September 3-17 

October 1-15-29 

November 12 - 25* 

December 10 - 23* 

* Note Change due to HoHdays 

The Board of Selectmen meets with the public at 

7:00 P.M 



COMPENSATION/BENEFITS 
COMMITTEE REPORT 

The Compensation/Benefits Committee was created by 
the voters at the March 2008 Town Meeting through the 
following Amendment to Warrant Article 2: 

"To see if the town will establish a committee 
of three (3) citizens, selected from a random 
drawing of volunteers, with two (2) Selectmen to 
serve as advisory and not voting members, with 
input participation by the Road Agent, to study 
and make recommendations on issues of salary 
compensation and medical and financial benefits. 
The recommendations are to be reported to the 
Selectmen and presented for ratification at the 
Town Meeting of March 2009. " 

A sign-up sheet for the committee was circulated at 
Town Meeting and posted on the bulletin boards at 
the Town Hall and Town Office. At the May 1, 2008 
Selectmen's Meeting, the names of the volunteers were 
placed on slips of paper. Selectman Cote checked the 
lists as Selectman Franz read the names from the slips 
of paper and placed them in "bowl". It was decided 
to choose three names to serve on the committee, as 
directed by Town Meeting, and one alternate, to serve 
should any of the chosen individuals be unable to serve. 
Selectman Conkey chose a name from the "bowl" 
reading each name aloud, this process continued until 



-10- 



four (4) names had been chosen. The results were: 

1. Darlene Oaks 

2. Andrew Houghton 

3. Linda Landry 

4. Robert Brown (alternate) 

Selectman Franz notified these individual and an 
organizational meeting was held on July 31, 2008. 
Andrew Houghton was elected Chairman of the 
Committee. Selectman Franz distributed a list of issues 
the Selectmen would like the Committee to consider 
regarding a compensation/benefits package for the Road 
Agent. The list included: 

• Salary with built in incremental raises. 

• Salary for eight (8) months and hourly for four (4) 
months (winter) budgeting for some overtime. 

• Compare hourly amount with other communities 
and strike an average 

• Compensatory time/No pay "use it or lose it 
policy" 

• Medical coverage for individual fiall 1 00% Co- 
payment or shared costs for two person and family 

• Dental Coverage 

• Insurance or benefit amount to be used in a 
"Cafeteria Plan" 

• Retirement: 403 B contribution w/town 
contribution 



-11- 



Selectman Franz asked that the committee be ready 
to present a proposal to the Board of Selectmen by 
December. Selectman Franz told the Committee that 
at least one Selectman would be available should the 
committee need information, and authorization was 
given to access information from HealthTrust, the current 
insurance provider. 

The committee agreed to proceed with the gathering of 
information regarding: 

• Benefit/Compensation packages offered by other 
towns comparable in population and equalized 
valuation to Dorchester. (Using the Wage, Salary 
& Benefits Survey from the Local Government 
Center) 

• Road Agent's job description and its relation to the 
duties of the Selectmen. 

• Current Benefit Plan (Insurance) 

• Current Salary Plan 

• The Road Agent's needs and requirements to make 
the job competitive. 

The Compensation/Benefit Committee decided to 
conduct its own survey of similar towns. *It was 
discovered that many towns are struggling with the same 
issues as Dorchester. The committee agreed to: 

• Contact HealthTrust about different health plans 
offered by the Local Government Center. 

• Invite a representative from HealthTrust to a 
meeting to explain each of the plans (pros and 
cons) 



-12- 



• Invite the Road Agent to attend the presentation 
of health plans. 

• Have the Road Agent provide an accurate 
measurement of the miles of road maintained 
including those that are maintained only in the 
winter or summer. 

Kim Bielecki from HealthTrust reviewed options 
available for health insurance; she also highlighted plans 
most commonly offered by other towns. 

The Committee proceeded to determine the value of 
the current benefit package and decided to use this as 
a baseline in providing a recommendation to the town. 
An assumption was made that any recommendation of 
reducing a benefit should not negatively affect the total 
compensation package as it was felt, by the committee, 
that this was not the intent of the town to lower the 
compensation of the Road Agent. 

After reviewing all of the information gathered over the 
past six months, the Committee voted unanimously to 
present the following recommendation to the Board of 
Selectmen and at the 2009 March Town Meeting: 



a. Increase the base salary of the Road Agent from 
$29,644.00 to $30,500.00/year 

b. Provide for the Road Agent's Medical Insurance 
-100% 



-13- 



c. Provide Family Medical Insurance Coverage at a 
rate of 80% covered by the Town and 20% covered 
by the Road Agent 

d. Discontinue current "compensation time" plan 
and enact, regardless of the time of year, overtime 
compensation at a rate of; 1 and one-half times the 
calculated hourly rate (base salary/2080 hours) for 
hours worked per week over 40 hours. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Andrew Houghton, Chairman 
Darlene Oaks 
Linda Landry 

Compensation/Benefits Committee 

*y45 the Committee encountered such difficulty in obtaining 
any solid responses or consensus from the available data, it 
requested and received funding from the Board of Selectmen to 
have the Local Government Center conduct a customized Pay 
and Classification Study for Dorchester A questionnaire was 
completed for the following positions: Road Agent, Highway 
Maintainer, Laborer and Custodian. Although, this may have 
been beyond the scope of this Committee, it is our hope that it will 
aid the town in providing a pay and benefit framework which will 
provide a means to set a salary/benefit scale that will take into 
consideration; years of service, as well as cost of living increases 
for not only the Road Agent but other employees as well. 



-14- 



DORCHESTER TOWN OFFICERS - 2008 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Albert John Franz 20 1 1 Chairman John A. Cote 2009 

DavidA. Conkey2010 

MODERATOR 

Arthur Burdette 2010 

TOWN TREASURER TOWN CLERK 

Brian A. Howe 2009 Brenda A. Howe 2009 

Jennifer Grace, Deputy Darlene Oaks, Deputy 

TAX COLLECTOR ROAD AGENT 

Brenda A. Howe 2009 George C. Conkey, II 20 1 1 

Darlene Oaks, Deputy 

ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER FOREST FIRE WARDEN 

Claudette "Cookie" Hebert Jay Legg 

Holly Conkey, Deputy 

HUMAN SERVICES DIRECTOR 

Linda M. Landry -- 523-71 19 
Patricia Franz, Deputy 

HEALTH OFFICERS 

Board of Selectmen 

PERMIT OFFICERS 

John A. Cote, Board of Selectmen, Road Agent 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

Arthur Burdette, Director Dillon Mock, Assistant Director 

TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 

Darlene Oaks 20 1 Carol Towne 20 1 1 Donna Abell 2009 

AUDITORS 

Martha Walker 2009 Holly Conkey 2009 

SUPERVISORS OF CHECKLIST 

Darlene Oaks 2012 Karen Limoges 2010 Holly Conkey 2014 

PLANNING BOARD 

Michael Howe 20 1 Chairman Linda Landry 2009 Patricia Franz 2010 
Arthur Burdette 201 1 John A. Cote, Sic. Rep. Adam McAllister, Alternate 

-15- 



BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 

David Morrill, Chairman Claudette "Cookie" Hebert Michael Landry 

Arthur Burdette David A. Conkey, Sic. Rep. 

CEMETERY TRUSTEES 

John Guamieri 2008 Arthur Burdette 2009 Elizabeth "Betty" Trought 20 1 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

John Morrissey, Chairman Joshua Trought Michael Majeski 

David Yetman, Alternate 

HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

Patricia Franz, Chairman Robert Pon Darlene Oaks 

Martha Walker Linda M. Landry 

REPRESENTATIVE TO MASCOMA HEALTH INITIATIVE 

Elizabeth "Betty" Trought 

MASCOMA VALLEY REGIONAL SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER 

Claudette "Cookie" Hebert 
MASCOMA VALLEY REGIONAL BUDGET COMMITTEE 

Amber Barsaleau 

REPRESENTATIVE TO UVLS REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION 

VACANT 
REPRESENTATIVE TO PEMI-BAKER SOLID WASTE DISTRICT 

Joshua Trought 
REPRESENTATIVE TO LAKES REGION MUTUAL FIRE AID 

Arthur Burdette 

MEETING TIMES 

Board of Selectmen Every other Thursday, 6:30 P.M. 

Town Office ~ 786-9476 
Town Clerk Wednesday, 3:00 PM. ~ 6:00 PM. 

Tax Collector Monday, 9:00 A.M. ~ 1 1 :00 A.M. 

Last Sat. of the month., 9:00 A.M. ~ 11:00 A.M. 
Town Office Home 

Phone: 786-9476 -786-9076 
Planning Board 2"'' Wednesday of each month 

Town Office - 786-9476 
Conservation Commission 2""^ Wednesday of each month 

Town Hall 
Board of Adjustment As required - Town Office 

Animal Control "Cookie" Hebert ~ 523-7803 

Holly Conkey ~ 786-2442 
Notary Public Sic. Mtgs. and upon request 523-71 19 

Free of Charge to Dorchester Residents 

-16- 



TOWN WARRANT 

The State of New Hampshire 

To the inhabitants of the Town of Dorchester in 
the County of Grafton in said state, qualified to 
vote in Town affairs: You are hereby notified 
to meet at the Town Hall in said Dorchester on 
Tuesday, the 10*^ day of March 2009, polls to be 
open for voting on Article 1 and Article 2 at 11 
o'clock in the forenoon, and to close not earlier 
than 7 o'clock in the afternoon, with action on 
the remaining articles to be taken commencing 
at 10 o'clock in the forenoon on Saturday, 
March 14, 2009. 

1 . To choose by nonpartisan ballot all necessary Town officers 
for the ensuing year. 

2. To adopt a Floodplain Management Ordinance so the Town 
will qualify for enrollment in the Flood Insurance Program. 

3. To see if the Town will vote to accept and implement the 
following recommendations by the Benefits/Compensation 
Committee established at the 2008 Town Meeting. 

a. Increase the base salary of the Road Agent from $29,644.00 to 
$30,500.00/year 

b. Provide for the Road Agent's Medical Insurance - 1 00% 

c. Provide Family Medical Insurance Coverage at a rate of 80% 
covered by the Town and 20% covered by the Road Agent 

d. Discontinue current "compensation time" plan and enact, 
regardless of the time of year, overtime compensation at a 
rate of; 1 and one-half times the calculated hourly rate (base 
salary/2080 hours) for hours worked per week over 40 hours. 



■17- 



4. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of three thousand dollars ($3,000.00) for the purpose 
of replacing the front doors and weatherizing all other 
outside doors on the Dorchester Town Hall and to authorize 
the withdrawal of three thousand ($3,000.00) from the 
Capital Reserve Fund created for that purpose in 1984. 

5. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of four hundred thirty-two thousand, three hundred 
sixty-six dollars ($432,366.00), to defray Town charges. 

6. To act upon any other business that may legally come 
before said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 19* day of February 2009. 




Albert John Franz, Chairman 



John A. Cote 




David A. Conkey 
Dorchester Selectmen 






•18- 



Budget - Town of . 



DORCHESTER 



FY 2009 



PURPOSE OF APPROPRIATIONS 
(RSA 32:3, V) 



OP Bud. Appropriations Actual Appropriations 

Warr. Prior Year As Expenditures Ensuing FY 

Art# Approved by DRA Prior Year (RECOMMENDED) 





GENERAL GOVERNMENT 




xxxxxxxxx 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


4130-4139 


Executive 




$ 


74,000.00 


$ 


71,412.88 


$ 


54,000.00 


4140-4149 


Election,Reg.& Vital Statistics 




$ 


4,000.00 


$ 


4,695.89 


$ 


2,936.00 


4150-4151 


Financial Administration 




$ 


40.00 


$ 


37.50 


$ 


12,000.00 


4152 


Revaluation of Property 




$ 


6,000.00 


$ 


3,762.36 


$ 


6,000.00 


4153 


Legal Expense 




$ 


12,000.00 


$ 


3,635.37 


$ 


3,500.00 


4154 


Reporting and Recorting 


Town Clerk's Office - Salaries, Fees, 


Expenses 


$ 


7,700.00 


4191-4193 


Planning & Zoning 




$ 


5,000.00 


$ 


3,241.94 


$ 


3,500.00 


4194 


General Government Buildings 




$ 


22,000.00 


$ 


26,962.58 


$ 


21,000.00 


4195 


Cemeteries 




$ 


2,500.00 


$ 


1,974.99 


$ 


2,500.00 


4196 


Insurance 




$ 


24,000.00 


$ 


27,510 90 


$ 


26,000.00 


4197 


Advertising & Regional Assoc. 




$ 


200,00 


$ 


25.00 


$ 


- 


4199 


Other General Government 




$ 


2,500.00 


$ 


3,122.56 


$ 


3,200.00 





PUBLIC SAFETY 




XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


4210-4214 


Police 




$ 


100.00 


s 


$ 


100.00 


4215-4219 


Ambulance 




$ 


5,500.00 


$ 


5,500.00 


$ 


5,500.00 


4220-4229 


Fire 




$ 


13,500.00 


$ 


8,713.42 


$ 


13,500.00 


4240-4249 


Building Inspection 










4290-4298 


Emergency Management 




$ 


500.00 


$ 


286.60 


$ 


500.00 


4299 


Other (Incl. Communications) 




$ 


3,800.00 


$ 


4,806.94 


$ 


5,000.00 



AIRPORT/AVIATION CENTER 



XXXXXXXXX 



XXXXXXXXX 



XXXXXXXXX 



4301-4309 


Airport Operations 













HIGHWAYS & STREETS 




XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


4311 


Administration 










4312 


Highways & StreeU 




$ 210,000.00 


$ 214,285.38 


*$222,564.00 


4313 


Bridges 


"Includes $12,564 00 FEMA Funds for completion of specific projects 


4316 


Street Lighting 


•Includes $31,051 64 Highway Block Grant 




4319 


Other 













SANITATION 




XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


4321 


Administration 




$ 


550.00 


$ 


$ 


50.00 1 


4323 


Solid Waste Collection 








1 


4324 


Solid Waste Disposal 




$ 


26,000.00 


$ 


25,517.65 


$ 


22,916.00 1 


4325 


Solid Waste Clean-up 








1 


4326-4329 


Sewage CoH. & Disposal & Other 




$ 


100.00 


$ 


100.00 


$ 


100.00 



■19- 



Budget - Town of. 
2 



.DORCHESTER 

3 4 



FY 2009 



OP Bud. Appropriations 
PURPOSE OF APPROPRIATIONS Warr. Prior Year As 
(RSA 32:3,V) Art.# Approved by DRA 



Actual Appropriations 

Expenditures Ensuing FY 

Prior Year (RECOMMENDED) 



TER DISTRIBUTION & TREATMENT 



xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx 



xxxxxxxxx 



Administration 










Water Services 










Water Treatment, Conserv.S Other 











ELECTRIC 



HEALTH 



CULTURE & RECREATION 



CONSERVATION 



DEBT SERVICE 



XXXXXXXXX xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx 



Admin, and Generation 










Purchase Costs 










Electric Equipment Maintenance 










Other Electric Costs 











xxxxxxxxx 



xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx 



Administration 










Pest Control 










Health Agencies & Hosp. & Other 




$ 3,000.00 


$ 2,783.00 


$ 2,800.00 



WELFARE 






XXXXXXXXX 


xxxxxxxxx 


XXXXXXXXX 


AdministraGon & Direct Assist 




$ 


15,000.00 


$ 7,181.70 


$ 


10,000.00 1 


intergovernmental Welfare Pymnts 








1 


Vendor Payments & Other 




$ 


1,800.00 


$ 1,80000 


$ 


1,300.00 



XXXXXXXXX 



xxxxxxxxx 



XXXXXXXXX 



Parlis & Recreation 










Libra7 










Patriotic Purposes 










Other Culture & Recreation 











XXXXXXXXX 



xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx 



Admin.& Purch. of Nat Resources 










Other Conservation 










REDEVELOPMENT & HOUSING 










ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 











xxxxxxxxx 



xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx 



Princ- Long Term Bonds & Notes 










Interest-Long Tenn Bonds & Notes 










Int on Tax Anticipation Notes 




$ 4,000.00 


$ 940.00 


$ 1,200.00 


Other Debt Service 











-20- 



MS-6 Budget - Town of . 

1 2 



_DORCHESTER 

3 4 



PURPOSE OF APPROPRIATIONS 
<RSA 32:3, V) 



OP Bud. Appropriations 
Warr. Prior Year As 

Art.# Approved by DRA 



Actual Appropriations 

Expenditures Ensuing Pf 

Prior Year (recommended) 





CAPITAL OUTLAY 




xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


4901 


Land 










4902 


Machinery, Veliicles & Equipment 










4903 


Buildings 






$ 1,000.00 


$ 1,000.00 


4909 


Improvements Other Than BIdgs. 






$ 500.00 


$ 500.00 





OPERATING TRANSFERS OUT 


XXXXXXXXX 


xxxxxxxxx 


XXXXXXXXX 


4912 


To Special Revenue Fund 










4913 


To Capital Projects Fund 










4914 


To Enterprise Fund 












Sewer- 












Water- 












Electric- 












Airport- 










4915 


To Capital Reserve Fund* 










4916 


To Enp.Tr.Fund-except »49ir 










4917 


To Health Maint Trust Funds' 










4918 


To Nonexpendable Trust Funds 










4919 


To Fiduciary Funds 










OPERATING BUDGET TOTAL 






$ 429,366.00 



"INDIVIDUAL WARRANT ARTICLES* 



"Individual" warrant articles are not necessarily the same as "special w arrant articles". Individual 
might be negotiated cost items for labor agreements or items of a one time nature y ou wish to adt 



Appropriatic Actual Appropriations 
PURPOSE OF APPROPRIATIONS Warr. ior Year i Expenditures Ensuing FY 
Acct-* (RSA32:3.V) Art.# roved by Prior Year (RECOMMENDED) 


4194 jREPLACE TOWN HALL FRONT DOORsj 4 






$ 3,000.00 


FROM BUILDING MAINTENANCE CAP RESERVE 









































































































-21- 



MS-6 Budget - Town of _ 

1 2 



_DORCHESTER 

3 4 



FY 2009 









Actual 


Estimated 






Wan Estimated Revenues 


Revenues 


Revenues 


AccL# 


SOURCE OF REVENUE 


\rt.i Prior Year 


Prior Year 


Ensuing Year 





TAXES 




xxxxxxxxx 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


3120 


Land Use Change Taxes - General Fund 




$ 


7,000.00 


$ 


2,860.00 


$ 


3,000.00 


3180 


Resident Taxes 








1 


3185 


Timber Taxes 




$ 


10,000.00 


$ 


5,279.57 


$ 


5,000.00 


3186 


Payment in Lieu of Taxes 






$ 


188.00 


$ 


188.00 


3189 


Other Taxes 








1 


3190 


Interest & Penalties on Delinquent Taxes 




$ 


6,000.00 


$ 


12,851.02 


$ 


8,000.00 




Inventory Penalties 










3187 


Excavation Tax ($.02 cents per cu yd) 













LICENSES, PERMITS & FEES 




XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


3210 


Business Licenses & Permits 




$ 


100.00 






3220 


Motor Vehicle Permit Fees 




$ 


48,000.00 


$ 49,351.40 


$ 48,000.00 


3230 


Building Permits 










3290 


Other Licenses, Permits & Fees 




$ 


800.00 


$ 1,082.32 


$ 1,000.00 


3311-3319 


FROM FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 













FROM STATE 




XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


3351 


Shared Revenues 




$ 


5,500.00 


$ 


11,801.00 


$ 


5,500.00 


3352 


Meals & Rooms Tax Distribution 




$ 


12,000.00 


$ 


16,677.22 


$ 


12,000.00 


3353 


Highway Block Grant 




$ 


31,119.73 


$ 


31,043.86 


$ 


31,051.64 


3354 


Water Pollution Grant 










3355 


Housing & Community Development 










3356 


State & Federal Forest Land Reimbursement 




$ 


700.00 


$ 


733.44 


$ 


7OO.O0J 


3357 


Flood Control Reimbursement 










3359 


Other (Including Railroad Tax) 






$ 


34.04 




3379 


FROM OTHER GOVERNMENTS 






$ 


13,719.35 







CHARGES FOR SERVICES 




XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


3401-3406 


Income from Departments 




$ 


$ 




3409 


Other Charges 




$ 


$ 657.50 







MISCELLANEOUS REVENUES 




XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


XXXXXXXXX 


3501 


Sale of Municipal Property 






$ 12,701.50 




3502 


Interest on Investments 






$ 89.43 




3503-3509 


Other -Refunds 






$ 1,374 68 





MS-S 
Rev. 07/07 



-22- 



MS-6 Budget - Town of _ 

1 2 



.DORCHESTER 

3 4 









Actual 


Estimated 






Warr. ed R< 


Revenues 


Revenues 


Acct. # 


SOURCE OF REVENUE 


Art.# iorY< 


Prior Year 


Ensuing Year 



INTERFUND OPERATING TRANSFERS IN xxxxxx. 


xxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxxxx 


3912 


From Special Revenue Funds 










3913 


From Capital Projects Funds 










3914 


From Enterprise Funds 












Sewer -(Offset) 












Water -{Offset) 












Electric -(Offset) 












Airport -(Offset) 










3915 


From Capital Resen/e Funds 








$ 3,000.00 


3916 


From Trust & Fiduciary Funds 










3917 


Transfers from Conservation Funds 











OTHER FINANCING SOURCES 



xxxxxxxxx 



xxxxxxxxx 



3934 |proc. from Long Term Bonds & Notes 










Amount VOTED From F(B ("Surplus") 










Fund Balance ("Surplus") to Reduce Taxes 






FEMA Funds 


$ 12,564.00 


TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUE & CREDITS 









**BUDGET 
SUMMARY** 





Prior Year 


Ensuing Year 


Operating Budget Appropriations Recommended (from page 4) 


$ 436.090.00 


$ 429,366.00 


Special Warrant Articles Recommended (from page 5) 






Individual Warrant Articles Recommended (from page 5) 




$ 3,000.00 


TOTAL Appropriations Recommended 


$ 436,090.00 


$ 432,366.00 


Less: Amount of Estimated Revenues & Credits (from above) 


$ 121,219.73 


$ 130,003.64 


Estimated Amount of Taxes to be Raised 


$ 314,870.27 


$ 302,362.36 



-23- 



DETAILED SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS 

Property Taxes: 

Current Year $647,142.93 

Interest $1,389.74 

Current Year Overpayment $1,923.82 

Prior Years $44,023.36 

Interest $1,871.94 

Principal Converted to Lien $41,117.87 

Redeemed Taxes: 

Prior Years - Lien Amount $43,996.89 

Costs & Interest $9,589.34 

Land Use Change Taxes 

Current Year $2,860.00 

Yield Taxes 

Current Year $5,279.57 

State of New Hampshire 

Revenue Sharing $11,801.00 

Rooms & Meals $16,677.22 

Highway Block Grant $3 1,043.86 

State Forest Land $733.44 

Tax Anticipation Loans $191,000.00 

Motor Vehicle Fees $49,351.40 

Dog Licenses & Penalties $696.00 

U.C.C. Filings $30.00 

Marriages $90.00 

Miscellaneous $2,055.54 

Planning Board/Board of Adjustment $400.00 

Interest on Deposits $89.43 

Bureau of Land Management $188.00 

Cemetery Fees $400.00 

Sale of Municipal Property $12,701.50 

FEMA Storm Damage Mitigation Grant $13,719.35 

Emergency Management Planning Grant $4,000.00 

TOTAL RECEIPTS FOR 2008 $1,134,172.20 

Less Liens Purchased By Town ($41,117.87) 

Cash on Hand January 1, 2008 $122,753.86 

Cash Available for 2008 $1,215,808.19 

Disbursements - 2008 $1,060,735.15 

BALANCE ON HAND, 12/31/2008 $155,073.04 

-24- 



SUMMARY OF VALUATIONS 

Net Land Values, 28,062.8 acres $13,620,381.00 

Tax Exempt Land, 208.8 acres $455,100.00 

Net Taxable Land Value $13,165,281.00 

Current Use Valuation, 26,209.38 acres $1,540,181.00 

Residential Land, 1,644.49 acres $11,625,100.00 

Buildings (All) $18,786,500.00 

Less Tax Exempt Buildings $245,300.00 

Net Taxable Buildings Valuation $18,541,200.00 

Public Utilities, NH Electric Co-op $530,500.00 

Total Valuation Before Exemptions $32,236,981.00 

Elderly Exemptions $18,000.00 

Valuation on which tax rate is computed $32,218,981.00 

TAXES ASSESSED AND TAX RATE 

Total Property Taxes Assessed $732,944.00 

Less War Service Credits ($15,000.00 

Total Property Tax Commitment $717,944.00 

Tax Rate per $1,000.00 of Valuation $22.79 

Municipal $9.86 County $1.73 Local School $8.70 

State Education $2.50 

SCHEDULED OF TOWN PROPERTY 

Town House, Land & Buildings $112,000.00 

Contents $47,236.00 

Town Office, Land & Buildings $50,700.00 

Contents $16,253.00 

Police Department Equipment $100.00 

Highway Department, Land & Buildings $58,500.00 

Equipment & Materials $200,000.00 

Historical Museum $24,400.00 

Contents $16,025.00 

Other Town Land $106,000.00 

Town Property (Tax Deeded) $143,300.00 

Forest Fire Equipment $2,000.00 

TOTAL $776,514.00 



-25- 





FINANCIAL REPORT 

BALANCE SHEET DECEMBER 31, 2008 
ASSETS: 

Cash on Hand $155,073.04 

Funds in Custody of Treasurer $154,773.04 

Town Clerk/Tax Collector Cash $300.00 

Unredeemed Taxes $37,341.08 

Uncollected Taxes $80,696.07 

Total Assets $273,110.19 

LIABILITIES: 

Accounts owed by the Town: 

School Taxes Payable, January ~ June 2009 $171,441.30 

Tax Anticipation Notes $0.00 

Accrued Expenditures 2008 Budget $12,547.96 

Total Liabilities $183,989.26 

FUND BALANCE: 

Assets over Liabilities +$89,120.93 

RECONCILIATION: 

Fund Balance December 31, 2007 +$54,393.65 

Fund Balance December 31, 2008 +$89,120.93 

Change in Financial Condition +$34,727.28 



«DV 





-26- 



TREASURER'S REPORT 

December 31, 2008 
BALANCE: 

Cash On Hand January 1, 2008 $122,753.86 

Woodsville Guaranty $122,453.86 

Town Clerk/Tax Coll. Cash $300.00 

Received From: 

Tax Collector $758,077.59 

Town Clerk $50,598.22 

Selectmen $93,289.09 

Tax Anticipation Loan $191,000.00 

Interest on Accounts $89.00 

TOTAL RECEIPTS $1,093,054.33 

TOTAL AVAILABLE DURING 2008 $1,215,808.19 

Payments By Order of Selectmen $1,060,735.15 

Cash on Hand December 31, 2008 $155,073.04 

Woodsville Guaranty $154,773.04 

Town Clerk/Tax Coll $300.00 

TOTAL CASH ON HAND $155,073.04 

TOTAL ACCOUNT BALANCE $155,073.04 

RESPECTFULLY SUBMITTED 



i-a*ijlii 




-27- 



TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT 

Year Ending 12-31-08 

Uncollected Taxes - Beginning Year: 2008 Prior 

Property Taxes $86,091.23 

Taxes Committed This Year: 

Property Taxes $719,603.00 

Land Use Change Tax $7,935.00 

Timber Yield Tax $11,520.56 

Overpayments: 

Credits Refunded $1,521.00 

Interest $1,389.74 $5,370.29 

TOTAL DEBITS $739,945.22 $91,461.52 

Remitted to Treasurer During Year: 2008 Prior 

Property Taxes $647,674.22 $44,023.36 

Land Use Change $2,860.00 $0.00 

Timber Yield Tax $5,279.57 $7,344.42 

hiterests/Penalties $1,389.74 $5,370.29 

Conversion to Lien $41,117.87 

Prior Year Overpayments Assigned ($279.38) 

Abatements Made: 

Property Taxes $0.00 $950.00 

Land Use Change Taxes $2,325.00 $0.00 

Uncollected Taxes - End of Year 2008 

Property Taxes $71,928.78 

Land Use Change Taxes $2,750.00 

Timber Yield Taxes $6,240.99 

Property Tax Credit Balance ($223.70) 

TOTAL CREDITS $739,945.22 $91,461.52 

Unredeemed Liens Beginning of FY $36,735.50 

Liens Executed During FY $44,616.22 

Interest & Costs Collected $9,589.34 

TOTAL LIEN DEBITS $90,941.06 

Remitted to Treasurer: 

Redemptions $43,996.89 

Interest & Costs Collected $9,589.34 

Abatements of Unredeemed Liens $13.90 

Unredeemed Liens End of FY $37,340.93 

TOTAL LIEN CREDITS $90,941.06 

Sie^tdiz ^. ^(MAC, Tax Collector 
-28- 




TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 

^^l# December 31, 2008 W^ 

Cash on Hand 1/1/2008 $105.00 

Car Registrations - 569 $49,351.40 

UCC Filings $30.00 

Dog Licenses -110 $641.00 

Marriage Licenses - 2 $90.00 

Miscellaneous $362.82 

Filing fees 

Photo copies 

Tax Maps 

Certified Copies of Vitals 

Wetland Application 

Civil Forfeitures 

Return Check Charges 

TOTAL $50,475.22 

Total Remitted to Treasurer $50,475.22 

Town Clerk Cash on Hand $105.00 

Tax Collector Cash on Hand $195.00 

TOTAL CASH ON HAND $300.00 

^n^ttda f?W«e, Town Clerk 

AUDITORS' REPORT 

We the undersigned have examined the accounts of 
Selectmen, Treasurer, Tax Collector, Town Clerk, 
and Trustees of Trust Funds and find them properly 
and correctly vouched. 

January 27, 2009 Auditors 



^fjj^s^. /.f c. c^ai.i.. 



-29- 




■■) nl. CI 



2008 REPORT OF 
CEMETERY COMMITTEE 

On January 1, 2007, the revised TOWN OF 
DORCHESTER, NH, MUNICIPAL CEMETERIES, 
RULES & REGULATIONS went into effect. These rules 
ehminate the role of Cemetery Sexton and delegate those 
traditional roles to the Town Highway Department. New lot sizes 
have been somewhat changed and purchases of the Town's limited 
number of lots can be made through a Cemetery Trustee or the 
Town Clerk. Please note that the planting of new trees or shrubs 
in any Dorchester Cemetery is now regulated. The Cemetery 
Trustees strongly suggest that if you have family members buried 
in a Dorchester Cemetery you review a copy of the Rules & 
Regulations which may be obtained from the Town Clerk or one 
of the Cemetery Trustees. 

In 2008 Cemetery Trustee, Kevin Wall was successful in 
visiting our town cemeteries. Kevin collected digital photos and 
GPS coordinates for various cemeteries. This project is on going. 

In 2009 a tree removal program will commence in Cheever 
Cemetery. Also, the search to secure financing for a new Cheever 
Cemetery fence is on going. 

The Cemetery Committee has four major concerns at this 
time: 

1 . The increasing costs of Dorchester Cemetery maintenance 
for only three of our fifteen (15) identified cemeteries. 
We have met with the Dorchester Selectboard and 
obtained permission to use volunteers to help us provide 
maintenance for the cemeteries if they use their own 
equipment (a municipal insurance requirement). If you 
would be interested in assisting with some cemetery 
maintenance projects, please contact one of the Trustees. 



-30- 



2. The limited number of suitable lots available for future 
burials. We have been discussing this problem with the 
Selectboard and some local landowners. If you may be 
interested in donating some flat or well drained land to the 
Town or you know of land you think might be appropriate, 
please talk with a Trustee or a member of the Selectboard. 

3. Identifying appropriate burial markers for lots without 
headstones and obtaining appropriate lot markers to use in 
designating perimeters of lots. 

4. Providing an easily read map locating designated 
cemeteries for the Historical Society and interested 
members of the Dorchester Community. This project will 
be done in conjunction with the Dorchester Conservation 
Commission. 

2008 Total Expended: Cemeteries: $1,974.99 

George C. Conkey II $471.00 

Tina Danner $63.00 

Equipment/Expenses $308.75 

Martha Walker $512.00 

Equipment/Expenses $768.00 

FIC A/Withholding - Withheld from Salaries & Wages ($43.99) 

FICA/Withholding - Paid to Federal Govt $87.98 



-31- 



DETAILED REPORT OF PAYMENTS 

EXECUTIVE $72,905.06 

Executive Officers 

Conkey, David, Selectman, Salary $2,500.00 

Cote, John, Selectman, Salary $2,500.00 

Additional Wages & Exp. /Permit Officer $1,317.32 

Franz, Albert J., Selectman, Salary $2,500.00 

Additional Wages & Expenses $1,270.50 

Howe, Brian, Treasurer, Salary $1,500.00 

Additional Wages & Expenses $2,415.85 

Grace, Jennifer, Deputy Treasurer $60.00 

Howe, Brenda, Town Clerk, Salary $1,499.94 

Town Clerk Fees $2,216.75 

Additional Wages & Expenses $2,248.30 

Oaks, Darlene, Deputy Town Clerk, Salary $1,337.50 

Deputy Town Clerk, Fees $885.75 

Howe, Brenda, Tax Collector, Salary $2,000.00 

Tax Collector Fees $1,573.96 

Additional Wages & Expenses $2,866.70 

Oaks, Darlene, Deputy Tax Collector $60.00 

Abell, Donna, Trustee of Trust Funds $100.00 

Oaks, Darlene, Trustee of Trust Funds $100.00 

Towne, Carol, Trustee of Trust Funds $100.00 

Conkey, Holly, Auditor $150.00 

Walker, Martha, Auditor $150.00 

Expenses $5.77 

FICA/Withholding Withheld from SalariesAVages $(1,666.28) 

FICA/Withholding Paid to Federal Govt $4,379.35 

Executive Expenses 

AT&T $446.44 

Avitar Associates of New England $2,909.00 

Earthlink $87.80 

Fairpoint $652.60 

Largent, John (web design) $666.80 

Landry, Linda (Secretary /Bookkeeper) $16,640.00 



-32- 



FICA/Withholding Withheld from SalariesAVages $(3,472.96) 

FICA/Withholding Paid to Federal Govt $5,096.84 

Local Government Center $434.00 

Matthew Bender & Co. (Legal Books) $663.15 

NHCTCA/Dartmouth Lake Simapee Regional $60.00 

N.H. Electric Cooperative $192.18 

N.H. Municipal Association (Dues) $578.68 

N.H. Tax Collectors' Association $120.00 

Price Digest $36.00 

Rocky Branch Trading, LLC $691.55 

Rumney Post Office $1,074.00 

Staples (Office Supplies) $3499.89 

Tovm of Peterboro (Boston Cane) $105.00 

Treasurer, State of New Hampshire $100.00 

Verizon $282.68 

Office Expenses $9,970.00 

REGISTRATION/ELECTION $4,675.89 

Abell, Donna, Ballot Clerk $110.00 

Franz, Patricia, Ballot Clerk $205.00 

Morrissey, John III, Ballot Clerk $340.00 

Conkey, Holly, Supervisor $3 10.00 

Limoges, Karen, Supervisor $510.00 

Oaks, Darlene, Supervisor $926.12 

Trought, Elizabeth, Supervisor $357.00 

Howe, Brenda, Town Clerk $720.72 

Burdette, Arthur, Moderator $266.73 

Melanson, Henry, Moderator $268.00 

FICA/Withholding Withheld from SalariesAVages $(256.41) 

FICA/Withholding Paid to Federal Govt $523.84 

Burdette, Diana, ballot counter/election worker $122.20 

Davis, Michelle, ballot counter $20.00 

Grace, Scott, ballot counter $20.00 

Hebert, Claudette, ballot counter $20.00 

Howe Brian, ballot counter/election worker $50.00 

Howe, Matthew, ballot counter $20.00 



-33- 



Trought, Joshua, ballot counter $20.00 

Trought, William, ballot counter $20.00 

Salmon Press (notices) $27.00 

The Pemiysaver (notices) $51.50 

True Color Print & Design $24.19 

FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION $37.50 

Deluxe Business Systems (deposit slips) $37.50 

REVALUATION OF PROPERTY $4,033.52 

Morrill, David (Current Use) $304.25 

Landry, Linda $700.00 

FICA/Withholding Withheld from SalariesAVages $(56.94) 

FICA/Withholding Paid to Federal Govt $113.87 

Avitar Associates of New England $65.00 

Commerford, Nieder, Perkins (Assessors) $2,153.25 

Ferrell, Evelyn $210.00 

NH Association of Assessing Officials $20.00 

True Color Print and Design $78.80 

Office of Register of Deeds $445.29 

LEGAL $4,500.07 

Mitchell, & Bates Professional $3,472.99 

Mitchell Municipal Group, PA $590.31 

Driveway Regulations/Litigation $2,815.72 

General Government $1,684.35 

Franz, A. John (Driveway Litigation) $75.00 

Franz, Patricia (Driveway Litigation) $75.00 

Landry, Linda (Driveway Litigation) $260.00 

FICA/Withholding Withheld from SalariesAVages $(26.78) 

FICA/Withholding Paid to Federal Govt $53.55 

PLANNING & ZONING $4,129.03 

Burdette, Arthur (Board of Adjustment) $250.00 

Burdette, Arthur (Planning Board) $250.00 

Conkey, David (Board of Adjustment) $250.00 

Cote, John A. (Planning Board) $250.00 

-34- 



Franz, Patricia (Planning Board) $250.00 

Hebert, Claudette (Board of Adjustment) $250.00 

Howe, Michael (Planning Board) $250.00 

Landry, Linda (Planning Board) $250.00 

Landry, Linda (Board of Adjustment secretary) $110.00 

Landry, Linda (Planning Board/Board of Adj. Exp.) $200.40 

Landry, Michael (Board of Adjustment) $250.00 

Morrill, David (Board of Adjustment) $250.00 

FICA/Withholding Withheld from SalariesAVages $(199.62) 

FICA/Withholding Paid to Federal Govt $886.41 

The Pennysaver (notices) $82.50 

Valley News (notices) $59.34 

Upper Valley Lake Sunapee Council $490.00 

GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS $26,220.30 

Barrows, Christopher (Buildings & Grounds) $1,600.00 

Hebert, Claudette (Custodian) $1,235.00 

Danner, Tina (Custodian) $72.00 

Poitras, Clarence Jr. (Buildings & Grounds) $16.00 

Franz, John (Buildings & Grounds) $210.00 

FICA/Withholding Withheld from SalariesAVages $(239.71) 

FICA/Withholding Paid to Federal Govt $478.11 

AT&T $275.36 

Barrows, Christopher (Expenses) $6.49 

Belletetes Inc $43.43 

Brown's Hardwoods Inc $1,950.00 

Canaan Hardware $701.47 

Dead River Co. (fuel) $6,873.11 

Dorchester Plumbing and Heating $3,060.83 

Enfield Hardware $59.67 

Fairpoint $305.62 

Franz, J. Albert (Expenses) $136.00 

F.C. Hammond & Son Lumber Co $162.00 

Hebert, Claudette (Expenses) $24.82 

K & R Portable Toilets $2,270.00 

Legg'sLogs $50.40 

Mike Howe's Off-Road $1,126.50 

-35- 



N.H. Electric Cooperative $1,322.34 

Posnanski,Al $340.00 

Rands Do It Best $42.58 

Rocky Branch Trading, LLC $411.23 

Rte. 118 Automotive $40.00 

Small Engine Technology $149.50 

Tri-State Fire Protection (fire extinguishers) $120.07 

Venture Print (Sign) $304.00 

Verizon $135.47 

Yeaton Oil Co. (fuel) $2,938.01 

CEMETERIES $1,974.99 

George C. Conkey, II $471.00 

Banner, Tina $63.00 

Equipment Expense $117.00 

Walker, Martha $512.00 

Equipment Expense $768.00 

FICA/Withholding Withheld from SalariesAVages $(43.99) 

FICA/Withholding Paid to Federal Govt $87.98 

INSURANCE $29,080.75 

HealthTrust (health insurance) $21,222.27 

Property/Liability $5,246.40 

Workers' Compensation $2,537.08 

Unemployment Compensation $75.00 

REGIONAL ASSOCIATION $25.00 

NH Health Officers Association $25.00 

SURPLUS PROPERTIES $190.10 

North Country News (advertising) $60.00 

Valley News (advertising) $130.10 

TAX DEED PROPERTIES $134.00 

KC Tire Recycling LLC $134.00 

TAX LIEN PROPERTIES $408.00 

Lynn W. Wheeler (Title Search) $408.00 



-36- 



TOWN OF DORCHESTER (Lien Purchases) $44,616.22 

TOWN REPORT $1,281.46 

Fred B. Estabrook Co. (printing) $949.00 

Landry, Linda (preparation) $360.00 

FICA/Withholding Withheld from SalariesAVages $(27.54) 

TIMBER SURVEY $1,109.00 

Dennis Thorell (Town Forester) $1,109.00 

PUBLIC SAFETY $22,506.07 

Ambulance $5,500.00 

Canaan F.A.S.T $2,750.00 

Warren/Wentworth Ambulance $2,750.00 

Fire Protection $7,954.00 

Town of Rumney $7,954.00 

Forest Fire Dept $7.34 

Emergency Management $4,286.60 

Expenses $286.00 

Hubbard Consulting (grant money) .... $4,000.00 

Communications 

Lakes Region Mutual Fire Aid $3,491.17 

Animal Control $1,266.96 

Conkey, Holly $35.00 

Hebert, Claudette $305.00 

FICAAVithholding Withheld from SalariesAVages$(26.01) 

FICAAVithholding Paid to Federal Govt $52.03 

Cardigan Veterinary Clinic $288.20 

Hebert, Claudette $148.79 

IDS (dog tags) $76.26 

Rands Do It Best $137.69 

Upper Valley Humane Society $250.00 

HIGHWAYS i& STREETS $217,263.30 

Payroll $57,597.40 

FICA/Withholding Withheld from SalariesAVages $(18,500.72) 

FICA/Withholding Paid to Federal Govt $13,058.28 

Paid to State of NH $8,970.00 

N.H. Retirement $4,386.46 

Town Maintenance $151,751.88 

-37- 



SANITATION $25,695.83 

Administration 

Pemi-Baker Solid Waste District Dues $441 .07 

Plymouth Village Water & Sewer $100.00 

Solid Waste Disposal 

Town of Rumney, Transfer Station $25,154.76 

HEALTH $2,783.00 

Senior Citizens Council Inc $800.00 

Visiting Nurse Alliance VT & NH $1,600.00 

West Central Services $383.00 

WELFARE $9,643.47 

Administration & Direct Assistance 

Landry, Linda, Director $1,200.00 

Franz, Patricia, Assistant Director $60.00 

FICA/Withholding Withheld from Salaries/Wages $(96.40) 

FIC A/Withholding Paid to Federal Govt $289.16 

Bailey, Pattie $1,300.00 

N.H. Electric Cooperative $3,182.52 

Patriot Fuels, Inc $1,788.19 

Vendor Payments 

Tri-County Community Action $1,300.00 

Voices Against Violence $500.00 

CAPITAL OUTLAY $1,500.00 

Building Restoration Grant Search 

Catelena Consulting, LLC $500.00 

Public Works Grant Search 

Catelena Consulting, LLC $500.00 

Cemeteries Grant Search 

Catelena Consulting, LLC $500.00 

REFUNDS $1,613.40 

RicciardiA $1,613.40 

Wargo,W. $92.40 



-38- 



ABATEMENTS $762.47 

Zielinski $762.47 

DEBT SERVICE $191,940.00 

Tax Anticipation Loan Principal $191,000.00 

Tax Anticipation Loan Interest $940.00 

NSF CHECK REDUCTIONS $139.00 

NSF Check Deposit Amount $123.00 

NSF Check Bank Fee $16.00 

GRAFTON COUNTY TAXES $57,101.00 

MASCOMA SCHOOL DISTRICT... $379,082.94 

TOTAL CHECKS & TRANSFERS $1,105,351.37 

Less Purchase of Tax Liens ($44,616.22) 

TOTAL PAYMENT $1,060,735.15 




Receipts January 1, 2008 thru December 31, 2008 $1,093,054.33 

Cash On Hand January 1, 2008 $122,753.86 

Total Available $1,215,808.19 

Disbursements January 1, 2008 thru December 31, 2008 $1,060,735.15 

General Fund $155,073.04 

Cash on Hand December 31, 2008 $155,073.04 



-39- 



2008 ROAD MONEY 
DISTRIBUTION 

PAYROLL $65,511.42 

George C. Conkey II (Road Agent) $29,643.90 

George C. Conkey II (Additional Wages) $1,140.00 

Conkey, Daniel $470.00 

Cote, John $146.00 

Hebert, Claudette $32.00 

Landry, Michael $137.50 

Lassor, Brian $455.00 

Lassor, Lynn $3,555.00 

Poitras, Clarence Jr $548.00 

Stockwell, Dean $100.00 

Walker, Gary $100.00 

Walker, Larry $20,780.00 

Wilkins, George $250.00 

Yetman, David $240.00 

PICA & Withholding Withheld from Salaries AVages ($18,500.72) 

PICA/Withholding Paid to Federal Govt $13,058.28 

state of NH (DHHS) $8,970.00 

NH Retirement System $4,386.46 

GENERAL HIGHWAY EXPENSES $10,444.28 

A.M. Rand Co $8.74 

B-B Chain $1,589.85 

Belletetes Inc $114.20 

Canaan Hardware $599.14 

Conkey, Daniel $48.00 

Howe, Brian $192.96 

KC Tire Recycling LLC $120.70 

Kelley Mackenzie Auto Parts $69.56 

Kibby Equipment $561.58 

Kirks Truck Auto & Tire Center $13.00 

Lakes Region Two Way $327.75 

Mike Howe's Off Road $55.00 

NHPWMAP $25.00 

North Country News (publishing bids) $60.00 

Rands Do It Best Hardware $615.85 



-40- 



Rocky Branch Trading, LLC $158.44 

Sabil & Sons $1,168.49 

Sanel Auto Parts $63.32 

Sosmetal Products $132.71 

Stay Safe Traffic Products, Inc $262.85 

The Pennysaver (publishing bids) $176.00 

Treasurer State of NH (signs) $100.00 

Tri State Fire Protection (fire extinguishers) $120.08 

UniFirst (uniforms) $2,711.50 

Wise Guy's Auto Parts $1,149.56 

FUEL $17,229.64 

Bradford/Pratt's Co. (diesel) $13,792.16 

Ryezak's One Stop & Oil Co $3,437.48 

INTERNATIONAL TRUCK EXPENSES $9,649.19 

Jordan Equipment $2,283.36 

Kevin Bolash Welding $1,873.11 

Liberty International $889.11 

Mike Howe's Off Road $523.50 

Monroe Repairs $639.33 

Northeast Tire Service, Inc $1,903.40 

Sabil & Sons $981.13 

Rte. 118 Automotive $491.84 

Wise Guys Auto Parts $64.41 

FORD 550 TRUCK EXPENSES $4,929.50 

E.W Sleeper Co $1,387.74 

Jordan Equipment $616.58 

Kevin Bolash Welding $794.55 

Kirks Truck Auto & Tire Center $2,025.50 

Irwin Zone $105.13 

CHEVROLET 5500 Expenses/Lease $39,880.74 

Conkey, George $488.91 

GMAC Financial Services $18,966.38 

Kirks Truck Auto & Tire Center $375.00 

Mike Howe's Off-Road $435.13 

Northeast Tire Service, Inc $461.39 



-41- 



Quirk Chevrolet $18,966.38 

Rte. 118 Automotive $121.05 

Sabil & Sons $66.50 

FORD RANGER $5,967.93 

Ford Motor Credit $4,995.48 

Mike Howe's Off-Road $124.50 

Monroe Repairs $134.79 

Irwin Zone $375.20 

Pemi Glass Company, LLC $225.00 

Rte. 118 Automotive $112.96 

CATERPILLAR LOADER $21,048.12 

Caterpillar Financial Lease $12,169.35 

Lakes Region Two- Way $465.55 

Mike Howe's Off-Road $1,907.00 

Northeast Tire Service, Inc $62.00 

Southworth-Milton Inc $6,444.22 

CASE LOADER $95.44 

Townline Equipment $95.44 

OTHER EQUIPMENT & MAINTENANCE $2,880.76 

AIRGAS $186.37 

Brian Howe $224.00 

Dean Stockwell $28.94 

George C. Conkey II $84.00 

Joe's Equipment Service $599.95 

Jordan Equipment $555.75 

Kevin Bolash Welding $449.50 

Merriam Graves $152.40 

Mike Howe's Off-Road $564.85 

Small Engine Technology $35.00 

RENTALS $8,021.42 

Carl Matthews Equipment $1,585.00 

E.W. Sleeper $3,036.42 

Owens Leasing Co $2,220.00 

Upper Valley Equipment Rental, Inc $1 , 1 80.00 

-42- 



MAINTENANCE MATERIALS $16,414.38 

Cargill Incorporated (Salt) $6,023.19 

Ferguson (culverts) $1,134.54 

Larry Walker $4.00 

Pike Industries Inc $2,002.15 

Warren Sand & Gravel $6,638.50 

United Rentals $612.00 

SHOP EXPENSES $2,607.48 

Dead River Company $67.82 

Fairpoint Communications $442.94 

Mt. Carr Building Products, LLC $317.92 

N.H. Electric Cooperative $1,415.64 

Rochester Truck Repair LLC $110.22 

Verizon $252.94 

CONTRACTED SERVICES $12,583.00 

Blaktop, Inc $8,500.00 

Michael A. Landry $160.00 

Richard Remade Construction Co $2,448.00 

LL.C. Tree & Crane Service $1,475.00 




-43- 



2008 ROAD MONEY DISTRIBUTION 
SUMMARY 

PAYROLL $65,511.42 

GENERAL HIGHWAY EXPENSES $10,444.28 

FUEL $17,229.64 

INTERNATIONAL TRUCK $9,649.19 

FORD 550 TRUCK $4,929.50 

CHEVROLET 5500 TRUCK $39,880.74 

FORD RANGER TRUCK $5,967.93 

CATERPILLAR LOADER $21,048.12 

CASE LOADER $95.44 

OTHER EQUIPMENT $2,880.76 

RENTALS $8,021.42 

MAINTENANCE MATERIALS $16,414.38 

SHOP EXPENSES $2,607.48 

CONTRACTED SERVICES $12,583.00 

TOTAL $217,263.30 




-44- 



Road Agent's Report 

Dorchester has long been described as "unique" by its 
outside service providers, and state agencies. The Dorchester 
Highway Department deals with this "uniqueness" on a daily 
basis and realizes that it is that same "uniqueness" that makes 
Dorchester such a great place to live and raise a family. 

The Dorchester Highway Department's first commitment is to 
Dorchester's residents, whether it be keeping the school bus 
routes plowed and sanded, well before the P^ run of the day, 
or making sure that residents, working "second shift", make 
it home safely. The Highway Department is also responsible 
for making sure that the taxpayers of Dorchester, whether 
or not they live on a town maintained road, get the most out 
of their tax dollars. This is accomplished, not only by the 
careful monitoring of expenditures, but also by insuring that 
any damage done to town roads is documented, repaired and 
when appropriate back-charged to the appropriate party. 

Repairing damaged roads is often an easy fix - a little 
material, replacement of a culvert and some ditching and 
we're back on the road again, unfortunately bridges are 
another matter. The State of New Hampshire carefully 
monitors municipal owned bridges; through site inspections 
at least once a year and often twice. The repair of a bridge 
is generally more than the Highway Department can handle 
and the cost can often run into the hundreds of thousands of 
dollars, so it is in the best interest of everyone to protect our 
bridges. The Dorchester Board of Selectmen have instituted a 



-45- 



policy of requiring the users of town bridges who exceed the 
state recommended weight Hmits to bond the bridges. This 
poUcy has proven very successful in not only protecting our 
town bridges, but also in monitoring their usage. 

The Dorchester Highway Department has once again been 
forced to deal with not only "Mother Nature" and her 
quirky sense of humor, (diligent beavers, way-ward moose, 
and minute by minute changeable weather), but also the 
"crashing" economy and fate (just plain bad LUCK!). 
The high cost of diesel fuel, maintenance materials, and oil 
based products forced us to put many planned projects on 
indefinite HOLD. However, with the help of Larry Walker, 
a great deal was accomplished. Repairs to the "Old" North 
Dorchester Road were initiated in May 2008 and included 
the placement of "geo-fabric" and gravel in an area that has 
generally been wet. Culverts were replace, and gravel, stone 
and trap rock added to Cummins Pond Hill. In an effort to 
defray the cost of trucking and purchasing winter sand, the 
highway crew screened and stockpiled all the loose sand in 
the highway yard resulting in enough winter sand to sustain 
us through the winter. The Highway Department was allowed 
to try out a small road grader from E.W. Sleeper for several 
weeks, and the Selectmen agreed to rent it for an additional 
two weeks, enabling us to grade all of Dorchester's gravel 
roads. Roadside mowing was accomplished with rented 
mowers and town labor. Early in September, three culverts 
along River Road were replaced and paving bids sought. 
Blaktop received the bid which included paving the culvert 
cuts on River Road, and Streeter Woods Road. 



-46- 



Heavy rains during the last part of July into the early part 
of August resulted in considerable damage to several roads 
in Dorchester. Several culverts failed along the North 
Dorchester Road requiring replacement, as well as a failed 
culvert at the end of Paul Smith Road. The heavy rains of 
August 6, 2008, resulted in the erosion of the ditches and 
subsequently the shoulders along Walker Hill as well as 
the erosion of the ditches and pavement along Bickford 
Woods Road. FEMA declared the rain/flood event a disaster 
on September 5, making Dorchester eligible for FEMA 
funds. Working with Selectman Cote, highway liaison, 
an application for FEMA funds was completed along with 
the required documentation. Late in November the town 
received $13, 719.35 from FEMA. A portion of this was 
reimbursement for work completed, with the remaining funds, 
±$12,000, to be used this coming year to affect the following 
repairs: Walker Hill - Repair of the shoulders by adding 
aggregate (material). Bickford Woods Road - Replacement 
of failed culvert, grinding 50% of the pavement affected 
installation of geo-fabric and paving the affected area. These 
repairs will need to be completed by March 2010. 

Rolling into November, the Highway Department was ready 
for winter; winter sand and salt was up and the trucks were 
ready roll. Both Larry and I were feeling pretty good about 
what we had been able to accomplish. Unfortunately on 
November 4, Election Day, while in Wentworth loading 
some lumber to repair a storage building, Larry Walker fell 
breaking his left leg. This injury has kept Larry laid up for 
the winter, but at the writing of this report, I am happy to say 



-47- 



he is making good progress and has even been seen checking 
in at the Highway Garage every now and then. Larry's 
expertise and knowledge of the town's equipment and roads is 
invaluable and sorely missed. With the help of Lynn Lassor 
and Michael Landry, I have managed to keep both trucks 
plowing and sanding. Hopefiilly, with the coming of warmer 
weather Larry will be able to join the Dorchester Highway 
Department once again, at whatever level he is up for. 

Plans for 2009 include completing the FEMA work, 
continued ditching and culvert replacement and of course my 
personal goal; the rebuilding of Cheever Road. With the poor 
economy and an effort to hold budgets down, our only hope 
is that we receive some of the promised "stimulus" money or 
that we receive some grant money. 

In closing, the Dorchester Highway Department is here 
for you, the people of Dorchester. If you require anything 
regarding town roads, please call the Highway Garage and 
leave a message (786-2385); and I will return your call as 
soon as I am able. 

Respectfully submitted, 
George C. Conkey, II 
Road Agent 



-48- 



Summary of the Dorchester 
2008 Town Meeting 

March 15, 2008 Town Meeting opened at 10:00 A.M. 

Moderator Henry L. Melanson opened the meeting and gave 
instructions to the voters gathered. He then read Article 1 and the 
results of the 2008 Town Election. 

Article 1. To choose by nonpartisan ballot all necessary 
Town officers for the ensuing year. 
Results of the Town Elections held on March 11th, 2008: 
Selectman for three (3) years - A. John Franz - 105 Votes 
Treasurer for one (1) year - Brian Howe - 130 Votes 
Town Clerk for one (1) year - Brenda Howe - 139 Votes 
Tax Collector for one (1) year - Brenda Howe - 137 Votes 
Trustee of the Trust Funds for three (3) years 

Carol Towne - 133 Votes 
Auditors for one (1) year (vote for two) 

Martha Walker - 118 Votes 

Holly Conkev - 82 Votes 
Cemetery Trustee for three (3) years - Kevin Wall - 6 Votes 
Planning Board for three (3) years 

Arthur Burdette - 127 Votes 
Highway (Road) Agent for three (3) years 

George C. Conkev H - 106 Votes 
Supervisor of Checklist for six (6) years 

Hollv Conkev - 124 Votes 
Moderator for two (2) years - Arthur Burdette - 29 Votes 

Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to continue, until 
rescinded by a vote of the Town, the Road or Highway Agent's 
Health Benefit Policy as adopted by the Selectmen on January 
24, 2002, which provides that the Town will contribute 60% of 
the cost of a full family plan to a newly elected Highway Agent 
m year one of his/her term, 80% in year two and 100%) in year 
three and thereafter upon his/her re-election. 

By PETITION 



Article 2 read by the Moderator. 

Put on the floor by Brian Howe and Seconded by John Franz 

Open to discussion. 

John Franz presented an amendment: To assure community 
involvement, knowledge open discussion and fiscal 
responsibility in the planning of medical benefits and 
compensation the following amendment is offered: 

To see if the town will establish a committee of three (3) 
citizens, selected from a random drawing of volunteers and 
two selectmen, with input participation by the Road Agent 
to study and make recommendations on issues of salary 
compensation and medical and financial benefits. The 
recommendations are to be reported to the selectmen and 
presented for ratification at the Town Meeting of March 09 

Seconded by David Conkey 
Open for discussion 

John Franz explained need 

Brian Howe explained why the petition article was put on 

the waiTant. He explained the benefits of both insurance programs 

that were under discussion. 

Betty Trought voiced her views on the amendment. If the article 

passed without amendment this would tie the Selectmen's hands. 

Selectmen would not be able to fiinction properly. 
Afi:er further discussion the Moderator had John Franz reread his 
amendment. 
John Franz read Amendment 

Ron Charrette questioned 2 Selectmen on the committee. 

He recommended the Selectmen act only as advisory at this point 

because they would be making the final decision of what to put on 

the March 2009 Warrant. 
Article read as amended 
Moderator called for a hand count. 

28 -YES 25 - NO Amendment PASSED 

Betty Trought asked to amend the amendment as follows: 

To see if the town will establish a committee of three (3) 

-ii- 



citizens, selected from a random drawing of volunteers, 
with two (2) Selectmen to serve as advisory and not voting 
members, with input participation by the Road Agent, 
to study and make recommendation on issues of salary 
compensation and medical and financial benefits. The 
recommendations are to be reported to the Selectmen and 
presented for ratification at the Town Meeting of March 
2009. 

Seconded by William Trought 

The amendment passed by voice vote 

The moderator read the Article as amended and called for a voice 

vote. 

ARTICLE 2 PASSED as Amended 

A sign up sheet for the committee was circulated 

Article 3. To see if the town of Dorchester will vote to raise the 
veteran's tax exemption from fifty dollars ($50.00) annually to 
five hundred dollars ($500.00) annually. 

By PETITION 

Moderator read Article 3 

Put on the floor by John Morrissey and Betty Trought 

Open for discussion 

John Franz put an amendment on the floor to change Article 3 
to read as follows: 

To see if the Town of Dorchester will vote to raise the 
veteran's tax exemption from fifty dollars ($50.00) annually 
to one hundred ($100.00) annually. 

Seconded by Brian Howe 

Open for discussion 

Brian Howe presented comparisons to other towns. 

-iii- 



Regina Deming spoke in favor of raising benefit 

Monica Cox spoke about supporting veterans and asked 

about 5.5 veterans getting veterans' disability exemption. 

Brian Howe explained DRA's reasoning for only allowing half 

exemption. He also resented a petition requesting a paper ballot 

vote. 

Paula Stone asked about comparing to Orange or Wentworth town 

exemption 

Brian Howe explained that he put the comparison together using 

the large town of Concord, Londonderry, and Manchester to 

illustrate the disparity between costs to taxpayers in towns with 

small tax bases like Dorchester and towns with large tax bases. 

Also the large towns had people in their assessors' offices to 

provide information - small towns did not. 

Carol Charrette. whose husband is a veteran, did not think it fair to 

ask neighbors to pay for their taxes. 

David Morrill moved the question 
Seconded by Michael Howe 
Voted to move the question 

Vote to move the question: PASSED 

Moderator read the article as amended. Called for a vote by 

show of hands. 27-YES 25-NO 

After more discussion the Moderator closed the article 

Read as amended 

Voted by paper ballot 

68 Votes cast: 49-YES 18-NO 1-not marked 

ARTICLE 3 PASSED as Amended 

Article 4. Shall the Town of Dorchester vote to adopt the 

provisions of RSA 72:35-1 -a "the optional tax credit for service- 

cormected total disability, upon adoption by a city or town 

pursuant to RSA 72:27-a" and amend provisions to provide a 

credit available for the disabled veteran's credit to $2,000.00. A 

credit is the amount deducted from the bill. Effective tax year 

2008 

By PETITION 



-IV- 



Moderator read the Article 

Put on the floor by WilHam Trought and David Morrill. 

Open for discussion 

David Morrill would like to amend to change the amount to 
$1,000.00 from $2,000.00. 

Seconded by John Franz 

David Morrill explained his reasons 

Betty Trought spoke in favor of the $2,000.00 or more 

William Trought asked about the history of exemptions in town 

John Franz said at least 20+ years 

Arthur Burdette spoke in favor of $2,000.00 

David Morrill expressed concern about rising taxes 

Monica Cox spoke in favor of maximum exemption 

John Franz expressed concerns about the community's financial 

ability to pay. 

Malcolm Ray thanked the veterans for their service 

Motion to move the question by Betty Trought, Seconded by 

John Morrissey 
PASSED 

Article read as amended 
Voice Vote NO Amendment FAILED 



Article 4 read as warned 
ARTICLE 4 PASSED 

David Morrill questioned voice vote as he had requested a paper 

ballot and submitted the required signatures. 
Moderator said he would disallow the voice vote and move to a 
paper ballot. 

David Morrill withdrew paper ballot motion 

Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to approve the following 
resolution to be forwarded to out State Representatives, our State 
Senator and our Governor: 



-v- 



Resolved: We the citizens of Dorchester, NH believe in a New 
Hampshire that is just and fair. The property tax has become unjust 
and unfair. State leaders who take a pledge for no new taxes perpetuate 
higher and higher property taxes. We call on our State Representatives, 
our State Senator and our Governor to reject the "Pledge", have an open 
discussion covering all options, and adopt a revenue system that lowers 
property taxes. 

By PETITION 

Moderator read Article 5 

Put on the floor by Betty Trought, Seconded by William Trought 

Open for discussion 

Betty Trought explained the reason she submitted the Article for 

the Warrant 

David Morrill made a motion to table the Article 

John Franz spoke in favor of the Article 

William Trought spoke in favor of the Article 

Betty Trought stressed the need 
No one seconded the Motion 

Moderator moved the question 
Article was read as warned. 
ARTICLE 5 PASSED 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of four hundred thirty-six thousand, ninety dollars 
($436,090.00) to defray Town charges 

Moderator read Article 6 

Put on the floor by John Franz and David Conkey 

Open for discussion 

John Franz explained high increases in fuel and welfare costs 

Betty Trought questioned Salaried Officers getting additional 

wages 

Brian Howe sited examples of doing jobs not related to positions 

held 

Betty Trought would like to see those jobs posted so people can 

volunteer. 



-VI- 



Brian Howe asked to amend article. Motion to Amend Article 6 so 
that it reads as follows: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of four hundred forty-two thousand, ninety dollars 
($442,090.00) to defray Town charges. Six thousand dollars 
($6,000.00) of which shall be added to the amount posted 
to line 4312 - Highways and Streets of the published 2008 
budget to increase each step of the Highway Agent's salary 
scale which was adopted in 2002 and amended in 2007, by 
$5,000.00 as foUows: 

l^^year- $32,000.00 

2nd ygar $32,810.00 

3'^''year- $34,644.00 

And to provide one thousand dollars ($1,000.00) to offset 
the related increases in the Town's portion of FICA and 
retirement payments. 

Seconded by Michael Howe 

David Morrill spoke against the amendment 

John Franz spoke against the amendment 

Brian Howe explained reasons for amendment was the fact the 

Selectmen had inserted only one article in six (6) years to raise 

the Road Agent's salary by 3.49%, which did not begin to cover 

the cost of inflation. The $5,000.00 increase and the $1,000.00 

passed in 2007 amount to an annual 3.25% increase over the 6 year 

period. 

Ron Charrette spoke 

David Morrill questioned if passed can the money be designated or 

just go into the general fiind 

After more discussion 

John Franz moved the question 

Seconded by David Conkey 

Moderator read the article as amended 
Voice Vote - NO 

Moderator read the Article as warned 
PASSED as warned 



-Vll- 



Betty Trough! asked about having more information available 
before the Budget Hearing. 

Article 7. To act upon any other business that may legally 
come before said meeting. 

Article 7 read by the Moderator 

Open for discussion 

Linda Landry thanked the Treasurer, Town Clerk/Tax Collector, 

and Selectmen for their efforts in moving the Town's Fund Balance 

from -$45,000 on 12-31-2006 to a +$54,000.00 on 12-31-2007. 

Monica Cox asked what would happen with the monies left in the 

town coffers. 

Brian Howe explained 

John Franz spoke about improvements to the Town Web Site. He 

read a plaque in recognition of service on the Planning Board 

to David DeVall. He presented a plaque to Hank Melanson for 

service as Moderator for the Town. David Yetman thanked Hank 

Melanson for his patience with the town's people. 

John Franz presented Malcohn Ray with the BOSTON POST 

CANE for being the oldest citizen in Dorchester. 

Michael Landry congratulated the Road Agent, George Conkey 

and Larry Walker on a job well don this year. 

Meeting closed at 12:49 P.M. 

Submitted by Brenda Howe, 
Town Clerk of Dorchester, NH 



-vni- 



DORCHESTER 
PLANNING BOARD 2008 

The Dorchester Planning Board began 2008 under the capable 
Chairmanship of Michael Howe. Long time Planning Board 
member David DeVall was unable to complete his term due to 
moving from the area, his position on the Planning Board was 
filled by alternate Arthur Burdette, until March, when he was 
elected to a 3 year term. Adam McAlister was appointed to 
serve as alternate. With a full Board in place we were ready for 
what turned out to be a very active year. 

March brought the first of two approved minor subdivisions. 
The first called for the subdivision of Lot #4-321.2; a 13.7 acre 
lot located on Hearse House Road belonging to Christopher 
Curtis. The subdivision created two lots, one lot consisting of 
2.47 acres and a second lot consisting of 11.2 acres. The final 
hearing on the Subdivision was held in May, and due to careful 
scrutiny and adherence to Dorchester's Subdivision Regulations 
along with a good working relationship with Cardigan Mountain 
Land Surveys out of Orange, the Subdivision was approved 
unanimously. The second approved Minor Subdivision called 
for the subdivision of Lot #4-323.1; a 13.86 acre lot located on 
Cheever Road belonging to Dorchester Holdings, LLC. The 
subdivision created 3 lots. Once again the subdivision won 
unanimous approval and will prove to be beneficial to both the 
owner and the Town. 

Two other proposed subdivisions never made it to the Public 
Hearing stage, having not met one of the key elements of 
Dorchester's Land Use Regulations: No lot shall be created 
which does not have at least 200 feet of frontage on a Class V 
public road. The owners of these two lots have the option of 



-49- 



appealing the ruling to the Dorchester Board of Adjustment. 

Planning Board Member, Arthur Burdette who also serves 
as Dorchester's Emergency Management Director presented 
the Planning Board with a new challenge - To make flood 
insurance available to Dorchester residents. Mr. Burdette 
outlined the steps Dorchester must take to participate in 
the National Flood Insurance Program. In order for this to 
become a reality Dorchester would have to adopt a Floodplain 
Management Ordinance. The drafting and presentation of 
this ordinance would become a priority for the Dorchester 
Planning Board, as it would need to be presented to the voters 
for approval at the March 2009 Town Meeting. Work began 
in earnest with the meeting of June 1 1 , when Jennifer Gilbert, 
Assistant State Coordinator, National Flood Insurance met 
with Planning Board. Ms. Gilbert explained that there is no 
Federal law that requires a town to join the program and town 
participation is voluntary. However, the benefits to the town and 
its citizens are: 

• By participating in the program, all citizens of 
Dorchester are provided with the opportunity to purchase 
flood insurance to protect themselves from flood losses. 

• If FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) has 
designated areas in Dorchester as being flood-prone, and 
Dorchester has not joined NFIP, there will be no financial 
assistance for buildings/properties in flood hazard areas. 
In the past, Dorchester has received funds from FEMA to 
repair flood damage. 

Currently there are several areas, in Dorchester, designated by 
FEMA as "flood prone"; these areas are relatively small in area 
and are not heavily populated. The steps Dorchester would need 
to take to join NFIP were: 

• Submit an Application for Participation; the application 
requires the town's name, person responsible for 



-50- 



administering the community's floodplain management 
program, a place designated for public inspection of 
floodplain maps, and estimates of land area, population, 
and number of structures in and outside the floodplain. 

• The town must adopt a Resolution of Intent, which 
indicates an explicit desire to participate in the NFIP and 
commitment to recognize flood hazards and carry out the 
objectives of the Program. 

• The town must adopt and submit floodplain management 
regulations that meet or exceed the minimum floodplain 
management requirements of the NFIP. 

The Application for Participation and the Resolution of 
Intent were drafted and approved by the Dorchester Board of 
Selectmen during the following months. It was decided, by the 
Planning Board, to draft a "stand alone" floodplain ordinance; 
an ordinance that would work in tandem with Dorchester's 
building permitting process. Dorchester's Floodplain 
Management Ordinance can be found at the end of this report. 
The Planning Board urges you to become familiar with this 
ordinance, review the maps that indicate "flood prone" areas in 
Dorchester, and most important of all please vote to approve this 
ordinance on March 1 0, 2009 so you and your neighbors can 
purchase flood insurance through the National Flood Insurance 
Program. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Dorchester Planning Board 



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TOWN OF DORCHESTER 

FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT 

ORDINANCE 

SECTION I - PURPOSE 

Certain areas of the Town of Dorchester, New Hampshire 
are subject to periodic flooding, causing serious damage 
to properties within these areas. ReUef is available in the 
form of flood insurance as authorized by the National Flood 
Insurance Act of 1968. Therefore, the Town of Dorchester, New 
Hampshire has chosen to become a participating community if 
the National Flood Insurance Program, and agrees to comply 
with the requirements of National Flood Insurance Act of 
1968 (RL. 90-488, as amended) as detailed in this Floodplain 
Management Ordinance. 

This Ordinance establishes a permit system and review 
procedure for development activities in the designated flood 
hazard areas of the Town of Dorchester, New Hampshire. 

SECTION II - ESTABLISHMENT 

This ordinance, adopted pursuant to the authority of RSA 
674:16, shall be known as the Town of Dorchester Floodplain 
Management Ordinance. 

The following regulations in this ordinance shall apply to all 
lands designated as special flood hazard areas by the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in its "Flood 
Insurance Study for Grafton County, NH" dated February 
20, 2008, or as amended, together with the associated Flood 
Insurance Rate Maps dated February 20, 2008, or as amended, 
which are declared to be a part of this ordinance and are hereby 
incorporated by reference. 



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SECTION III - PERMITS 

All proposed development in any special flood hazard area shall 
require a permit. 

SECTION IV - CONSTRUCTION 
REQUIREMENTS 

The Board of Selectmen shall review all building permit 
applications for new construction or substantial improvement to 
determine whether proposed building sites will be reasonably 
safe from flooding. If a proposed building site is located in a 
special flood hazard area, all new construction or substantial 
improvements shall: 

a. be designed (or modified) and adequately anchored 
to prevent floatation, collapse, or lateral movement 
of the structure resulting from hydrodynamic and 
hydrostatic loads, including the effects of buoyancy, 

b. be constructed with materials resistant to flood 
damage, 

c. be constructed by methods and practices that 
minimize flood damages, 

d. be constructed with electrical, heating, ventilation, 
plumbing, and air conditioning equipment, and other 
service facilities that are designed and/or located so 
as to prevent water from entering or accumulating 
within the components during conditions of flooding. 

SECTION V - WATER AND SEWER SYSTEMS 

Where new or replacement water and sewer systems (including 
on-site systems) are proposed in a special flood hazard area, the 
applicant shall provide the Board of Selectmen with assurance 



-53- 



that these systems will be designed to minimize or eliminate 
infiltration of flood waters into the systems and discharges 
from the systems into flood waters, and on-site waste disposal 
systems will be located to avoid impairment to them or 
contamination from them during periods of flooding. 

SECTION VI - CERTIFICATION 

For all new substantially improved structures located in special 
flood hazard areas, the applicant shall furnish the following 
information to the Board of Selectmen: 

a. The as-built elevation (in relation to NGVD) of the 
lowest floor (including basement), including whether 
or not such structures contain a basement. 

b. If the structure has been floodproofed, the as- 
built elevation (in relation to NGVD) to which the 
structure was floodproofed. 

c. Any certification of floodproofing. 

The Board of Selectmen shall maintain the aforementioned 
information for public inspection, and shall furnish such 
information upon request. 

SECTION VII - OTHER PERMITS 

The Board of Selectmen shall not grant a building permit 
until the applicant certifies that all necessary permits have 
been received from those governmental agencies from which 
approval is required by federal or state law, including Section 
404 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 
1972, 33 U.S.C. 1334. 



-54- 



SECTION VTII - WATERCOURSES 

1 . In riverine situations, prior to the alteration or relocation 
of a watercourse the applicant for such authorization 
shall notify the Wetlands Bureau of the New Hampshire 
Department of Environmental Services and submit 
copies of such notification to the Board of Selectmen, 
in addition to the copies required by the RSA 482 -A:3. 
Further, the applicant shall be required to submit copies 
of said notification to those adjacent communities as 
determined by the Board of Selectmen, including notice 
of all scheduled hearings before the Wetlands Bureau. 

2. The applicant shall submit to the Board of Selectmen 
certification provided by a registered professional 
engineer assuring that the flood-carrying capacity of 
an altered or relocated watercourse can and will be 
maintained. 

3. The Board of Selectmen shall obtain , review, and 
reasonably utilize any floodway data available from 
Federal, State, or other sources as criteria for requiring 
that all development located in Zone A meet the following 
floodway requirement: 

"No encroachments, including fill, new construction, 
substantial improvement, and other development are 
allowed within the floodway that would result in any 
increase in flood levels within the community during 

the base flood discharge." 

SECTION IX - SPECIAL FLOOD HAZARD AREAS 

1 . In Zone A the Board of Selectmen shall obtain, review, 
and reasonably utilize any 100-year flood elevation 



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data available from any federal, state or other source 
including data submitted for development proposals 
submitted to the community (i.e. subdivisions, site plan 
approvals). 

The Board of Selectmen's 100-year flood elevation 
determination will be used as criteria for requiring in 
Zone A that: 

a. All new construction or substantial improvement 
of residential structures have the lowest floor 
(including basement) elevated to or above the 

1 00-year flood elevation. 

b. That all new construction or substantial 
improvements of non-residential structures have 
the lowest floor (including basement) elevated to 
or above the 100-year flood level; or together with 
attendant utility and sanitary facilities, shall: 

(i) be floodproofed so that below the 

1 00-year flood elevation the structure 
is watertight with walls substantially 
impermeable to the passage of water; 

(ii) have structural components 

capable of resisting hydrostatic and 
hydrodynamic loads and the effects 
of buoyancy; and 

(iii) be certified by a registered 

professional engineer or architect 
that the design and methods of 
construction are in accordance 



-56- 



with accepted standards of practice 
for meeting the provisions of this 
section. 

c. All manufactured homes to be placed or 
substantially improved within special flood hazard 
areas shall be elevated on a permanent foundation 
such that the lowest floor of the manufactured 
home is at or above the 100-year flood elevation; 
and shall be securely anchored to resist floatation, 
collapse, or lateral movement. Methods of 
anchoring may include, but are not limited to, use 
of over-the-top or frame ties to ground anchors. 

d. All recreational vehicles placed on sites within 
Zone A shall either: 

(i) be on the site for fewer than 1 80 
consecutive days; 

(ii) be fully licensed and ready for 
highway use; or, 

(iii) meet all standards of Section III 

of this ordinance and the elevation 
and anchoring requirements for 
"manufactured homes" in Section IX 
(2) (c) of this ordinance. 

A recreational vehicle is ready for highway use if it is on its 
wheels or jacking system, is attached to the site only by quick 
disconnect type utilities and security devices, and has no 
permanently attached additions. 



-57- 



e. For all new construction and substantial 
improvements, fially enclosed areas below the 
lowest floor that are subject to flooding are 
permitted provided they meet the following 
requirements: 

(i) the enclosed area is unfinished or 
flood resistant, usable solely for the 
parking of vehicles, building access 
or storage; 

(ii) the area is not a basement; and 

(iii) shall be designed to automatically 
equalize hydrostatic flood forces on 
exterior walls by allowing for the 
entry and exit of floodwater. Designs 
for meeting this requirement must 
either be certified by a registered 
professional engineer or architect or 
must meet or exceed the following 
minimum criteria: A minimum of 
two openings having a total net area 
of not less than one square inch for 
every square foot of enclosed area 
subject to flooding shall be provided. 
The bottom of all openings shall be 
no higher than one foot above grade. 
Openings may be equipped with 
screens, louvers, or other coverings 
or devices provided that they permit 
the automatic entry and exit of 
floodwater. 



-58- 



SECTION X - VARIANCES AND APPEALS 

1. Any order, requirement, decision or determination of the 
Board of Selectmen made under this ordinance may be 
appealed to the Board of Adjustment as set forth in RSA 
676:5 

2. If the applicant, upon appeal, requests a variance as 
authorized by RSA 674:33, 1 (b), the applicant shall have 
the burden of showing in addition to the usual variance 
standards under state law that: 

a. the variance will not result in increased flood 
heights, additional threats to public safety, or 
extraordinary public expense; 

b. if the requested variance is for activity within a 
designated regulatory floodway, no increase in 
flood levels during the base flood discharge will 
result; and 

c. the variance is the minimum necessary, 
considering the flood hazard, to afford relief 

3. The Board of Adjustment shall notify the applicant in 
writing that: 

a. the issuance of a variance to construct below the 
base flood level will result in increased premium 
rates for flood insurance up to amounts as high as 
$25 for $100 of insurance coverage; and 

b. such construction below the base flood level 
increases risks to life and property. 



-59- 



Such notification shall be maintained with a record of all 
variance actions. 

4. The community shall: 

a. maintain a record of all variance actions, including 
their justification for their issuance; and 

b. report such variances issued in its annual or biennial 
report submitted to FEMA's Federal Insurance 
Administrator. 

SECTION XI - DEFINITIONS 

The following definitions shall apply only to this Floodplain 
Management Ordinance, and shall not be affected by the 
provisions of any other ordinance of the Town of Dorchester. 

1 . "Area of Special Flood Hazard" is the land in the 
floodplain within the Town of Dorchester subject to 

a one-percent or greater possibility of flooding in any 
given year. The area is designated as Zone A on the 
FIRM. 

2. "Base Flood" means the flood having a one-percent 
possibility of being equaled or exceeded in any given 
year. 

3. "Basement" means any area of a building having its 
floor subgrade on all sides. 

4. "Building" - see "structure." 

5. "Developmenf means any man-made change to 
improved or unimproved real estate, including but 
not limited to buildings or other structures, mining, 
dredging, filling, grading, paving, excavating 



-60- 



or drilling operation or storage of equipment or 
materials. 

6. "FEMA" means the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency. 

7. "Flood" or "Flooding" means an general and 
temporary condition of partial or complete inundation 
of normally dry land areas from: 

a. the overflow of inland or tidal waters, or 

b. the unusual and rapid accumulation or runoff of 
surface waters from any source. 

8. "Flood Insurance Rate Map" (FIRM) means a official 
map of a community, on which the Administrator has 
delineated both the special hazard areas and the risk 
premium zones applicable to the community. 

9. "Flood Insurance Study" (FIS) means an 
examination, evaluation and determination of flood 
hazards and, if appropriate, corresponding water 
surface elevations, or an examination, evaluation 
and determination of mudslide (i.e. mudflow) and/or 
flood-related erosion hazards. 

10. "Floodplain" or "Flood-prone area" means any area 
susceptible to being inundated by water from any 
source (see definition of "Floodway.") 

1 1 . "Flood proofing" means any combination of 
structural and non-structural additions, changes, or 
adjustments to structures that reduce or eliminate 
flood damage to real estate or improved real property. 



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water and sanitation facilities, structures and their 
contents. 

12. "Floodway" - see "regulatory Floodway." 

13. "Functionally dependent use" means a use that 
cannot perform its intended purpose unless it is 
located or carried out in close proximity to water. 
The term includes only docking and port facilities 
that are necessary for the loading/unloading of cargo 
or passengers, and ship building/repair facilities 
but does not include long-term storage or related 
manufacturing facilities. 

14. "Highest adjacent grade" means the highest natural 
elevation of the ground surface prior to construction 
next to the proposed walls of a structure. 

15. "Historic Structure" means any structure that is: 

a. Listed individually in the National Register 
of Historic Places (a listing maintained by the 
Department of Interior), preliminarily determined 
by the Secretary of the Interior as meeting the 
requirements for individual listing on the National 
Register; 

b. Certified or preliminarily determined by the 
Secretary of the Interior as contributing to the 
historical significance of a registered historic 
district or a district, preliminarily determined by 
the Secretary to qualify as a registered historic 
district: 



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c. Individually listed on a state inventory of 
historic places in states with historic preservation 
programs which have been approved by the 
Secretary of the Interior; or 

d. Individually listed on a local inventory of historic 
places in communities with historic preservation 
programs that have been certified either: 

i. by an approved state program as 

determined by the Secretary of the 

Interior, or 
ii. directly by the Secretary of the 

Interior in states without approved 

programs. 

16. "Lowest Floor" means the lowest floor of the lowest 
enclosed area (including basement). An unfinished or 
flood-resistant enclosure, usable solely for parking of 
vehicles, building access or storage in an area other 
than a basement area is not considered a building's 
lowest floor; provided that such an enclosure is not 
built so as to render the structure in violation of the 
applicable non-elevation design requirements of this 
ordinance. 

17. "Manufactured Home" means a structure, 
transportable in one or more sections, which is built 
on a permanent chassis and is designed for use with 
or without a permanent foundation when connected 
to the required utilities. For floodplain management 
purposes the term "manufactured home" includes 
park trailers, travel trailers, and other similar vehicles 
placed on site for greater than 1 80 consecutive days. 



-63- 



This includes manufactured homes located in a 
manufactured home park or subdivision. 

18. "Manufactured Home Park or Subdivision" means 
a parcel (or contiguous parcels) of land divided into 
two or more manufactured home lots for rent or sale. 

19. "Mean sea level" means the National Geodetic 
Vertical Datum (NGVD) of 1929, North American 
Vertical Datum (NAVD) of 1988, or other datum to 
which base flood elevations shown on a community's 
Flood Insurance Rate Maps are referenced. 

20. "New construction" means, for the purposes 
of determining insurance rates, structures for 
which the start of construction commenced on 
or after the effective date of an initial FIRM or 
after December 31, 1974, whichever is later, and 
includes any subsequent improvements to such 
structures. For floodplain management purposes, 
new construction means structures for which the 
start of construction commenced on or after the 
effective date of a floodplain management regulation 
adopted by a community and includes any subsequent 
improvements to such structures. 

21. "100-year flood" - see "base flood" 

22. "Recreational Vehicle" is defined as a vehicle: 

a. built on a single chassis; 

b. of 400 square feet or less when measured at the 
largest horizontal projection; 



-64- 



c. designed to be self-propelled or permanently 
towable by a light duty truck; and 

d. designed primarily not for use as a permanent 
dwelling but as temporary living quarters for 
recreational, camping, travel or seasonal use. 

23. "Regulatory floodway" means the channel of a river 
or other watercourse and the adjacent land areas that 
must be reserved in order to discharge the base flood 
without cumulatively increasing the water surface 
elevation more than a designated height. 

24. "Special Flood hazard area" - see "Area of Special 
Flood Hazard" 

25. "Start of Construction" includes substantial 
improvements, and means the date the building 
permit was issued, provided the actual start of 
construction, repair, reconstruction, placement, or 
other improvement was within 180 days of the permit 
date. The actual start means either the first placement 
of permanent construction of a structure on site, such 
as the pouring of slab or footings, the installation 

of piles, the construction of columns, or any work 
beyond the stage of excavation; or the placement of 
a manufactured home on a foundation. Permanent 
construction does not include land preparation, such 
as clearing, grading and filling; nor does it include 
the installation of streets and /or walkways; nor does 
it include excavation for a basement, footings, piers, 
or foundations or the erection of temporary forms; 
nor does it include the installation on the property 
of accessory buildings, such as garages or sheds 



-65- 



not occupied as dwelling units or part of the main 
structure. 

26. "Structure" means for floodplain management 
purposes, a walled and roofed building, including a 
gas or liquid storage tank that is principally above 
ground, as well as a manufactured home. 

27. "Substantial damage" means damage of any origin 
sustained by a structure whereby the cost of restoring 
the structure to its before damaged condition would 
equal or exceed 50 percent of the market value of the 
structure before the damage occurred. 

28. "Substantial Improvement" means any combination 
of repairs, reconstruction, alteration, or improvements 
to a structure in which the cumulative cost equals 

or exceeds fifty percent of the market value of the 
structure. The market value of the structure should 
equal: 

a. the appraised value prior to the start of the initial 
repair or improvement, or 

b. in the case of damage, the value of the structure 
prior to the damage occurring. 

For the purposes of this definition, "substantial 
improvemenf is considered to occur when the 
first alteration of any wall, ceiling, floor, or other 
structural part of the building commences, whether or 
not that alteration affects the external dimensions of 
the structure. This term includes structures that have 
incurred substantial damage, regardless of actual 
repair work performed. The term does not, however, 



-66- 



include any project for improvement of a structure 
required to comply with existing health, sanitary, or 
safety code specifications which are solely necessary 
to assure safe living conditions or any alteration of a 
"historic structure," provided that the alteration will 
not preclude the structure's continued designation as 
a "historic structure." 

29. "Violation" means the failure of a structure or 
other development to be fully compliant with the 
community's flood plain management regulations. A 
structure or other development without the elevation 
certificate, other certifications, or other evidence of 
compliance required under Section VI or Section IX 
(2)(b) of this ordinance is presumed to be a violation 
until such time as that documentation is provided. 

30. "Water surface elevation" means the height, in 
relation to the National Geodetic Vertical Datum 
(NGVD) of 1929, North American Vertical Datum 
(NAVD) of 1988, or other datum, where specified, of 
floods of various magnitudes and frequencies in the 
floodplains. 

SEVERABILITY SECTION 

The invalidity of any section or provision of this Ordinance shall 
not invalidate any other section or provision thereof. 

GREATER RESTRICTER SECTION 

If any provision of this ordinance differs or appears in conflict 
with any other ordinance or regulation, the provision imposing 
the greater restriction or more stringent standard shall be 
controlling. 



-67- 



ENFORCEMENT SECTION 

It shall be the duty of the Board of Selectmen (or their designee) 
to enforce and administer the provisions of this Ordinance in 
accordance with RSA 676. 




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w** • Dorcliesteir ^ 

Plannuig Boaircl Meetinqsi 

2009 

2nd Wednesdays 

7:00 P.M. 

Town Office 

January 14 

February 11 

March 11 

April 8 

May 13 

June 10 

Julys 

August 12 

September 9 

October 14 

November 11 

December 9 




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Animal Control Officer's Report 

Another year has passed, and this year to say the least, has been 
both challenging and rewarding at the same time. I would like 
to thank the town's people for being responsible animal owners 
and for allowing me to conduct my duties in keeping order and 
providing accountability. With the "trying" economic times 
that all our residents are feeling, I would like to commend you 
all in keeping up with the requirements of a pet owner. When 
I am called upon to do my duty, I am acting under NH RSA's. 
The enforcement of these statues, to keep order and peace, has 
proven to be vital in keeping Dorchester an attractive rural 
community in which to live. 

In the fall of 2008, 1 was involved in the process of completing 
an Emergency Operation Plan for Dorchester. The Emergency 
Operation Plan includes an extensive section dealing with the 
care and maintenance of ALL animals within Dorchester's 
boundaries during a man-made or natural emergency. I will be 
including a form with the Town's inventories, sent out annually 
in April, to be completed by all animal owners. This will allow 
me, in an event of an emergency; to do my job with ease and to 
effectively help in these emergency situations. Fm asking for 
your full support and if you have any questions or if you need 
help in completing this form; please call me. 

During the period between March 2008 and the writing of this 
report, I have had numerous calls that have impacted several 
residents in numerous ways. There have been situations where I 
have assisted town residents with nuisance complaints, assisted 
in the placement of animals put up for adoption and the removal 
of a dangerous trained attack dog that had been abandoned. I 
have experienced the disadvantages of people dropping off cats, 



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kittens and dogs in isolated areas of Town. I have worked with 
the Upper Valley Humane Society in placing these animals, 
when appropriate, in loving homes. 

I would like, at this time, to remind the members of our fine 
community that, during these tough economic times, there is 
help available. Several of these resources are local and can 
be of assistance in many different ways. Please contact me to 
learn more about these programs. Do not hesitate to contact 
me at any time if you have questions. I'm here for the people 
of Dorchester, to protect and serve, and I take great pride in 
my job. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

ACO Town of Dorchester 
603-523-7803 




-71- 



2008 REPORT OF TRUST FUNDS 
CAPITAL RESERVE FUNDS 

Town Building Fund 

Balance 12/31/07 $6,899.54 

New Funds 2008 $0.00 

Expended 2008 $0.00 

Interest 2008 $55.48 

Balance 12/31/08 $7,024.02 

Highway Equipment & Maintenance Fund 

Balance 12/31/07 $6,078.96 

New Funds 2008 $0.00 

Expended 2008 $0.00 

Interest 2008 $243.41 

Balance 12/31/08 $6,322.37 

Bridges Fund 

Balance 12/3 1/07 $506.14 

New Funds 2008 $0.00 

Expended 2008 $0.00 

Interest 2008 $2.78 

Balance 12/31/08 $508.92 

Property Revaluation Fund 

Balance 12/31/07 $381.73 

New Funds 2008 $0.00 

Expended 2008 $0.00 

Interest 2008 $2.07 

Balance 12/31/08 $383.80 

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CEMETERY TRUSTS 

Lucy Hazen & Sanborn Kimball Fund 

Balance ~ 12/31/07 $303.75 

Interest -^ 2008 $2.42 

Balance- 12/3 1/08 $306.16 

Scott Burleigh Fund 

Balance ~ 12/31/07 $919.02 

Interest ~ 2008 $7.39 

Balance ~ 12/31/08 $935.64 

Paul Hutchinson Fund 

Balance-- 12/3 1/07 $1,546.15 

Interest -- 2008 $12.31 

Balance -- 12/31/08 $1,558.46 

J.C. Davenport Fund 

Balance ~ 12/31/07 $221.86 

Interest ~ 2008 $1.77 

Balance - 12/31/08 $223.63 

Joseph & Katherine Grochocki Fund 

Balance ~ 12/31/07 $389.13 

Interest ~ 2008 $3.10 

Balance -- 12/31/08 $392.22 

Town Cemetery Fund 

Balance- 12/3 1/07 $2,444.62 

Interest ~ 2008 $19.46 

Balance ~ 12/31/08 $2,464.08 

All Cemeteries Fund 

Balance ~ 12/31/07 $2,285.24 

Interest ~ 2008 $20.58 

Balance ~ 12/31/08 $2,605.82 



-73- 



Upper Valley Lake Sunapee 
Regional Planning Commission 

The Commission is one of nine regional planning commissions 
in New Hampshire created to coordinate all aspects of planning, 
act as a liaison between local and state/federal agencies and 
provide advisory technical assistance on land use issues. We 
serve 27communities from Piermont to Charlestown along the 
Connecticut River and from Wilmot to Washington to the east. 

Over the past year the Commission has expended a significant 
amount of energy increasing visibility, public relations and 
identifying the needs of the communities, ultimately aimed at 
building stability and capacity in order to better address land use 
issues that are important to the long-term sustainability of the 
communities within the region. The Commission experienced 
a year of transition and expansion as it hired a Geographic 
Information Systems Analyst to provide mapping services and a 
new Executive Director to provide leadership and guidance. 

Revenue for the Commission was $565,964 for RY08. A large 
percentage of this funding comes from the Unified Planning 
Work Program utilizing Federal Highway Administration 
funding through the NH Department of Transportation. Other 
state and federal funding sources include the NH Department 
of Environmental Services, the NH Department of Safety 
- Homeland Security and Emergency Management, and the 
Office of Energy and Planning. Member communities and 
counties provide membership dies. In FY 2008 this allowed the 
Commission to leverage approximately $250,000 in state and 
federal funds, and provided with the Commission with just over 
15% of its revenue. 



-74- 



The Commission consists of representatives appointed by the 
leadership of each member municipality or county. These 
Commissioners represent your community's interests in the 
work the Commission does. The Commission had ten new 
Commissioners appointed by various municipalities and 
counties expanding resources and expertise within its leadership 
and demonstrating considerable renewed interest in regional 
collaboration. Additionally, Grafton County became a member 
of the Commission this year. 

Some of this year's highlights include completion of the Route 
120 Phase I Corridor Study in Lebanon and Hanover and a 
number of Human Transit Coordination plans and Hazard 
Mitigation plans. The Commission assisted communities in 
developing Master Plans in Claremont, Cornish, Acworth, 
Enfield and Lyme which will enable communities to better align 
their policies and land use decisions with the goals expressed 
through community participation. Direct planning assistance 
was made available to Planning Boards in Orford, Wilmot and 
Springfield, and regulatory review and ordinance assistance was 
provided to Claremont, Plainfield, Springfield and Washington. 

The Commission provides a significant amount of hours 
of technical assistance to communities that inquire about 
specific local issues, data requests or needed resources. 
The communities of Croydon, Lempster, Goshen, Cornish, 
Charlestown, New London, Hanover, Sunapee, Lebanon, 
Grantham, Dorchester, Newport, Unity, Orange, Enfield, 
Piermont, Plainfield and Leominster all took advantage of these 
services this past year. This pas year we also received inquires 
for assistance from regional and other organizations including 
the Sugar River Conservation Council, Connecticut River 
Joint Commissions, Mascoma River Watershed Council, Lake 
Sunapee Advisory Committee, The Nature Conservancy and 
Dartmouth College. 

-75- 



PemI- Baker Solid Waste District 
2008 Annual Report 

The Pemi-Baker Solid Waste District met five (5) times during 2008. 
This past year District programs provided residents access for 
proper disposal of their household hazardous wastes (HHW), paint, 
fluorescent light bulbs, antifreeze and rechargeable batteries. 

Participation Results 

The District held two (2) one-day HHW collections in 2008 (Lisbon 
and Plymouth). 204 vehicles serving an estimated 490 residents took 
part in the "program". This was an increase of 24 vehicles from 2007. 
There were also towns that brought waste that had been dropped off 
at their transfer stations since the last collections held in the fall of 
2007 

Table I. 2008 Participation Results 



Year 


#of 
Collections 


Program 
Population 


# of Vehicles 


Est. 

Population 

Served * 


Percentage of 
Population Served (est.) 


2008 


2 


29,971 


204 


490 


1.63% 


Table 2. 2004-2008 Participation Results 


Year 


#of 
Collections 


Program 
Population 


# of Vehicles 


Est. 

Population 

Served * 


Percentage of 
Population Served (est.) 


2004 


3 


26,627 


253 


607 


2.27% 


2005 


3 


26,627 


209 


502 


1.88% 


2006 


3 


26,627 


386 


926 


3.48% 


2007 


2 


29,971 


180 


432 


1.44% 


2008 


2 


29,971 


204 


490 


1.63% 



' Derived by niuliiplying Uie number ol' vehicles by 2 4 (the average household size) 

Program Costs 

The total cost for disposal for the one-day collection program was 
$28,680, which was a 27% increase from 2007. Income to offset 
this expenditure was received from participating non-District towns 
($2,875) and the NHDES HHW grant program ($7,300), resulting in 
a net cost of $18,505. The cost increase for the 2008 program can 
be attributed to three factors; (1) increase in the amount of non- 
processable paints collected, (2) an increase in the amount of pesticides 
collected, and (3) a significant increase in the charges associated with 
the Materials Recovery Fee (AARF) - see table 5. The MRF correlates 



-76- 



with the price of diesel fuel, bue to high diesel prices at the time of 
the collections, the District was assessed a fee rate of 17.5%. The 
rise in the amount of money the District has paid in MRFs in recent 
years is a concern. As part of a coordinated program with North 
County Council (NCC), the District will be looking at proposals from 
a number of HHW contractors to determine if there are more cost 
effective means to manage the one-day collection program in 2009. 



Tables. 


2008 Program 


Costs 










Year 


Program 
Pop. 


#of 
Vehicles 


Est. 

Popiilation 

Served 


Total Costs 

(Disposal & 

Fees) 


Cost/ 
Capita 


Cost/ 
Vehicle 


2008 


29,971 


204 


490 


$28,680 


$.96 


$141 



Table 4. 


2004 - 2008 Program Costs 










Year 


Program 
Pop. 


#of 
Vehicles 


Est. 

Population 

Served 


Total Costs 

(Disposal & 

Fees) 


Cost/ 
Capita 


Cost/ 
Vehicle 


2004 


26,627 


253 


607 


S22.342 


$.84 


$88 


2005 


26,627 


209 


502 


$22,015 


$.83 


5105 


2006 


26,627 


386 


926 


$30,980 


$1.16 


$80 


2007 


29,971 


181 


432 


$22,500 


$.75 


$124 


2008 


29,971 


204 


490 


$28,680 


$.96 


$141 



Table S. 


Breakout of HHW Costs (2006 - 2008) 








Year 


#of 
Collection 


Disposal 
Costs 


Site Set-up 
Fees 


Materials 
Recovery Fees 


MRF 
Rate 


Total Costs 


2006 


3 


$25,100 


$2,700 


$3,090 


11% 


$30,890 


2007 


2 


$18,300 


$1,800 


$2,300 


11.5% 


$22,400 


2008 


2 


$22,500 


$1,900 


$4,300 


17.5% 


$28,700 



An estimated 37,000 pounds of material was collected in this year's 
program, approximately 7% more than in 2007. The cost per pound 
was $0.77 



-77- 



Table 7. 2008 Waste Volumes Collected 



Year 


#of 
Vehicles 


Est. 

Popiilahon 

Served 


Total 
Pounds 


Total Costs 

(Disposal & 

Fees) 


lbs/Vehicle 


lbs/ 
"Participant" 


Cost/ lb. 


2008 


204 


490 


37,100 


$28,680 


182 


76 


$.77 


Table 8. 2004-2008 Waste Volumes Collected 


Year 


#of 
Vehicles 


Est. 

Population 

5erved 


Total 
Pounds 


Total Costs 

(Disposal & 

Fees) 


lbs/ Vehicle 


Lbs/ 
"Participant" 


cost/ lb. 


20CM 


253 


607 


32,176 


$22,342 


127 


53 


$.69 


2005 


209 


502 


33,090 


$22,015 


158 


66 


$.66 


2006 


386 


926 


45,408 


$30,980 


118 


49 


$.68 


2007 


T81 


432 


34,528 


$22,500 


191 


80 


$.65 


2008 


204 


490 


37,100 


$28,680 


182 


76 


$.77 



In 2009, residents from District communities will beable to participate 
in at least two one-day collections. NCC is hoping to secure a third 
location as well. The exact dates and locations have not been set 
at this time, but collections will be held sometime in late summer or 
early fall. In conjunction with the one-day collection program, many 
towns collected paint, used-oil, fluorescent light bulbs, antifreeze and 
rechargeable batteries at their municipal facilities. These programs 
typically provide less expensive recycling options while offering 
residents more opportunities to properly dispose of their hazardous 
materials. Residents should contact their local recycling center or 
town office to see what programs are available in their community. 

The District dealt with legislative issues as well. HB 1429, which would 
have impacted landfill operations in New Hampshire, posed serious 
concerns to the District. As drafted, HB 1429 had the potential to 
decrease landfill capacity in the State, decreasing competition, which 
could lead to disposal and transportation costs. The District sent a 
letter to the Senate Energy, Environment and Economic Development 
Committee in opposition to HB 1429 and some members testified in 
opposition as well. The bill reemerged from committee hearings as 
HB 1471, a directive to the Department of Environmental Services 
to prepare a plan and proposal for legislative action in the 2009 
legislative session addressing a number of items relating to solid waste 
management. 



-78- 



2009 will likely be a challenging year for many municipal recycling 
programs as they deal with budget issues and the recent slump in the 
prices paid for recyclables. However, the District is very fortunate 
to have a knowledgeable and innovative group of facility operators 
and committee representatives. If your town has questions issues, or 
concerns you would like to address please be sure to use the resources 
you have at your availability. Citizens interested in participating in the 
development of the District's programs are also welcomed to attend 
the District meetings. Information regarding the place and time of 
the meetings is available at all municipal offices or at NCC. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Robert Berti, 
Chairman, PBS WD 




-79- 



Report to the People of District One 

By 

Ray Burton, Councilor District One 

As I start my 3 P* and 32"^* years of service to this large Northern 
Council District, I am hopeful and excited for new opportunities 
for rural America. With a new administration in Washington 
new economic programs are in the future. Our role at the state, 
county and local level is to have justified applications that 
will be used to stimulate job retention and creation. County 
and regional economic development councils coupled with 
community action agencies will be putting these new initiatives 
to work. 

The NH Congressional Delegation - Senator Judd Gregg, 
Senator Jeanne Shaheen, Congressman Paul Hodes and 
Congresswoman Carol Shea Porter joining other Northeastern 
states of Maine, Vermont, New York and other New England 
Congressmen can cause new resources to become available. I 
urge that we, at the state, county and local levels of government, 
step up with our concerns and let them know our needs. 

2009 will start another year of the 10-year NH Highway 
Transportation Planning process working through the Regional 
Planning Commissions. Transportation Enhancement and 
Congestion Mitigation Air quality grants are back in play. 
Contact William Watson at NH DOT for details at 271-3344 or 
bwatson@dot.state.nh.us . 

The 2009 session of the NH House and Senate will be a 
trying time with proposed cutbacks and how to still provide 
and meet constitutional and statutory needs. Be watchful of 
proposed legislation passing costs to county and local levels of 



-80- 



government. Stay close to your local state senator and house 
members. 

The Governor and Council are always looking for volunteers 
to serve on the dozens of boards and commissions. If you are 
interested please send your resume to Governor John Lynch, 
State House, 107 North Main Street, Concord, NH 03301 
attention Jennifer Kuzma Director of Appointments/Liaison or 
at (603)271-2121. 

A complete list is available at the NH Secretary of State website 
at www.sos.nh.gov/redbook/index.htm 

My office has available informational items; NH Constitutions, 
tourist maps, consumer handbooks, etc. I send, via email, a 
Monday morning schedule. Send me your email address to be 
added to the list if you'd like at rburton^nh. gov . 

Please contact my office any time I can be of assistance to you. 



Towns in Council District #1 
CARROLL COUNTY: 

Aioany. Banien, 
Chatham. Conway. Eaian. 
EHingham FrBedom, Harfs Loc.. 
Jackson. Madison. Uoullonborougli, 
Ossipaa. Sandwich. Tainwonh, 
Tuftonboro, Wakefield, Woneboro. 



GRAFTON COUNTY: 



Bristol. Campton. Cana 
Dofchesier. Easlon. Ellsworth. 
Enlieid. Franconia. Grafton. 
Groton, Hanover. Havfertiill. 
Habron. Holdemass. Landafl. 

LivBrmora. LitllBlon. Lyman, 
Lyme. Monroe, Oranga, Ortord 
Ptarmont, Plymoulh. Rumney, 
Sugar HIM. Thornton, Warren. 
Watervjiie Valley, Wentworth. 
Woodstock 



BELKNAP COUNTY: 

AKon, Belmoni, Camer Harbor, 

Giltord. Uconia, Msredith. 

New Hampton. Sanbomion. TiUon 




COOS COUNTY: 



Berlin. Carroll, Clarksvills, 
Colabrook. Columbia. DaRon. 
Dixvilla. Oummer. Errol, 
Gortiam, Jellerson. Lancaster, 
Milan. Milislield. Northumberland. 
Pittsburg. Handolph, Shalbume, 
SiewartBtown, Stark. Strattord, 
WhUefiald 



SULLIVAN COUNTY: 

Charlesiown. Claremom. Cornish. 
Croydon. Graninam, Newpon 
PlamfJaid, Springfield. Sunapes 



-81- 



Report of Forest Fire Warden and 
State Forest Ranger 

Your local Forest Fire Warden, Fire Department, and the 
State of New Hampshire Division of Forests & Lands work 
collaboratively to reduce the risk and frequency of wildland 
fires in New Hampshire. To help us assist you, please contact 
you local Forest Fire Warden or Fire Department to determine if 
a permit is required before doing ANY outside burning. Under 
State law (RSA 227-L:17) a fire permit is required for all outside 
burning unless the ground is completely covered with snow. 
The New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services 
also prohibits the open burning of household waste. Citizens 
are encouraged to contact the local fire department or DES at 
1-800-498-6868 or www.des.state.nh.us for more information. 
Safe open burning requires diligence and responsibility. Help 
us to protect New Hampshire's forest resources. For more 
information please contact the Division of Forest & Lands at 
(603) 271-2214, or online at www.nhdfl.org . 

Spring fire season lasted unusually long this past year, with 
very high fire danger stretching into the first week of June. 
Once again, the rains started to fall during the summer and the 
fire activity was fairly light for the remainder of the year. The 
acreage burned was less than that of 2007. The largest forest 
fire during the 2008 season burned approximately 54 acres on 
Rattlesnake Mountain in Rumney on White Mountain National 
Forest property. Another 39 acre fire occurred on Mont Major 
in Alton during the month of April. Out statewide system of 
16 fire lookout towers is credited with keeping most fires small 
and saving several structures this season due o their quick and 
accurate spotting capabilities. Many homes in New Hampshire 
are located in the wildland urban interface, which is the area 
where homes and flammable wildland fuels intermix. Several 



-82- 



of the fires during the 2008 season threatened structures, a 
constant reminder that forest fires bum more than just trees. 
Homeowners should take measures to prevent a wildland fire 
from spreading to their home. Precautions include keeping 
your roof and gutters clear of leaves and pine needles, and 
maintaining adequate green space around your home free of 
flammable materials. Additional information and homeowner 
recommendations are available at www.firewise.org . Please help 
Smokey Bear, your local fire department and the state's Forest 
Rangers by being fire wise and fire safe! 



2008 FIRE STATISTICS 

(All fires reported as of November 24, 2008) 



res under the jui 


-isdiction o 


f the White Mc 


COUNTY STATISTICS | 


County 


Acres 


# of Fires 


Belknap 


43 


82 


Carroll 


6 


40 


Cheshire 


28 


45 


Coos 


5 


18 


Grafton 


12 


52 


Hillsborough 


13 


54 


Memmack 


12 


67 


Rockingham 


35 


46 


Strafford 


9 


20 


Sullivan 


12 


31 



90-j 


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} Acres 
I # of Fires 



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CAUSES OF FIRES REPORTED 

Arson 

Debris 

Camp fire 

Children 

Smoking 

Railroad 

Equipment 

Lightning 



Total Fires Total Acres 



Misc.* 



2 

173 

35 

23 

36 

2 

11 

11 
162 (*Misc.: power lines, fireworks, electric fences, etc.) 



2008 


455 


175 


2007 


437 


212 


2006 


500 


473 


2005 


546 


174 


2004 


482 


147 



O^^LY YOU CAN PREVENT WILDLAND FIRE 



-83- 



MASCOMA VALLEY HEALTH INITLVTIVE 

Representative of the Board of Directors 
Betty Ann Trought ~ Dorchester 

The Mascoma Valley Health Initiative (MVHI) is a nonprofit 
public health organization representing the five towns of 
Canaan, Dorchester, Enfield, Grafton and Orange. In the area 
of all health hazards, we have increased our region to include an 
additional eight towns. Our mission is to maintain and improve 
the health and well being of those who live, work and play in 
these thirteen communities through public health programs and 
education. 

Current Programs^ Activities and Services: 

• Service: Access to Health Care 

o MVHI is continuing its work with community members, 

municipalities, DHMC and others to determine the best way to 
address the issue of health care access. The goal of this project 
is to develop a plan to eliminate geographic barriers to health 
care for residents of this area. This plan may include improving 
the existing pubhc transportation system, the creation of a 
volunteer based transportation network, and improving local 
health care services like the free clinic. Implementation of this 
plan will take place in 2009/2010, pending sufficient funding. 

■ Population Served: This plan would be aimed at the 
estimated 1 ,200 Mascoma Valley residents without 
health insurance. 

■ Staff time: Approximately .5 FTE 

■ Funding Sources: On October 1, 2006 we were 
awarded a $39,000 planning grant from the New 
Hampshire Endowment for Health, continuing through 
December 31, 2008. Implementation funding from the 
Endowment may be available in June, 2009. 

o The entire staff has been trained to assist residents of 

Dorchester in the enrollment process for NH Healthy Kids, 
our State Children's Health Insurance Program. This makes 
it easier for residents to get health insurance for their kids by 
eliminating the need to drive to Claremont in order to sign up. 



■84- 



■ Population Served: Uninsured or under-insured 
children in Dorchester. 

■ Staff time: As needed 

■ Funding Sources: Alice Peck Day Memorial Hospital 
o MVHI continues to work with APD and the Community Oral 

Health Initiative to promote the Upper Valley Smiles dental 
health program in the Canaan and Enfield Elementary Schools. 

■ Staff time: As needed 

■ Funding Sources: Alice Peck Day Memorial Hospital 

Service: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention 

■ In June of 2008, we received two grants from the State 
of NH Department of Health and Human Services for 
funds to support a community-based tobacco coalition. 
One grant covers the services provided in the Mascoma 
Valley and the second grant covers the greater Upper 
Valley Region. Although we have two grants this year, 
due to budget cuts our funding was reduced by 25%. 
The Mascoma Valley Tobacco Coalition has over 20 
members representing 15 organizations. We work to 
prevent youth initiation of tobacco use, help tobacco 
users quit, and prevent exposure to secondhand smoke. 
The Tobacco Coalition as helped purchase educational 
materials for health teachers and guidance counselors 
at each of the schools in the Mascoma Valley School 
District. 

■ Population Served: Approximately 26% of Mascoma 
Valley residents use tobacco. It is unknown how 
many of these smokers have children or other family 
members living in the same home, so the extent of 
exposure to secondhand smoke is unclear. 

■ Staff Time: Approximately .25 FTE 

■ Funding Sources: One year grant from the NH DHHS 
Tobacco Prevention and Control Program, ending June 
30, 2009 

o In April of 2008, we received a grant of $ 1 5,000 from the 
National Association of County and City Health Officials 
(NACCHO). These funds support a project involving internal 
organizational capacity self-assessment and the implementation 
of a quality improvement project help improve our impact 



-85- 



on the community's health and wellness. This grant includes 
use of a self-assessment tool to evaluate how well MVHI 
achieves the goals of each of the ten essential services of public 
health. We were then to choose an area in which we would 
like to implement quality improvement exercises, in order to 
improve our effectiveness in helping our community attain a 
better overall health status. Based upon the internal assessment 
scoring, we chose to tackle the area of providing cuhurally 
appropriate materials, to a target population, in order to educate 
and encourage healthy behaviors. From this, we decided 
to work on the issue of oral health in children. Using the 
knowledge from past work with community partners including 
Red Logan Dental Clinic, Alice Peck Day Memorial Hospital, 
teachers, parents, and students at Enfield Village and Canaan 
Elementary Schools, we have come up with several ways 
to augment the existing programs, fill existing gaps, and fix 
past problems. These programs will be implemented through 
out the school year and include the possible re- introduction 
of fluoride into the schools, the sealant program for 2"^^ and 
3"^ graders, more education in the area of nutrition and how 
what you eat affects your oral and overall health, as well as 
strategically-timed education efforts and parental information 
on supplemental programs offered 

■ Population Served: Canaan & Enfield Elementary 
students and parents 

■ Staff Time: Approximately .25 FTE 

■ Funding Sources: Eight-month grant from the National 
Association of County and City Health Officials 
(NACCHO), ending November 30'^ 2008, work 
continuing through the spring. 

In September of 2008, MVHI received a grant for $10,000 from 
the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, through the Community 
Health Institute, the Multi-State Learning Collaborative, Phase 
III grant. This funding will allow us to assess our organization 
and identify gaps in public health activities in our community. 
Once the gaps have been identified we will collaborate with the 
appropriate community partners to implement an action plan to 
fill a specific gap. Once the plan has been tested and studied, 
we will make the appropriate adjustments and re-implement, 
until our evaluation efforts conclude we are successfully 
achieving our stated goals. Once we have experienced success. 



■86- 



we will move forward by again working with our partners to 
sustain this program. 

■ Population Serviced: Mascoma Valley residents 

■ Staff Time: Approximately .10 FTE 

■ Funding Source: Fifteen month grant from the Robert 
Wood Johnson Foundation, the Multi-State Learning 
Collaborative grant, ending December Of 2009. 

o In 2004, MVHI was chosen to be the pilot site for a statewide 
youth suicide prevention project entitled Frameworks. By 
the end of March 2007, almost 400 local professionals and 
community members have received this important training, 
including over 100 students at Mascoma Valley Regional High 
School. MVHI helped develop a sustainability plan to ensure 
this information continues to reach residents who might have 
the opportunity to help prevent a tragedy. This plan includes 
continued suicide prevention training in the high school through 
the health class. 

■ Population Served: MVRHS students 

■ Staff Time: Semi-annual meetings 

■ Funding Sources: None 

Service: Health Education 

o In the past we had created a quarterly newsletter, which is 
delivered to all households in the Mascoma Valley. This 
newsletter included seasonal health and safety tips, along 
with information about our organization, current programs 
and upcoming events. Die to lack of funding we are no 
longer able to provide this newsletter. 

■ Population Served: All residents of Dorchester 

■ Staff Time: Approximately 40 hours per quarter 

■ Funding Sources: For fiscal year 2009 there is no 
funding. 

o On September 29*'' 2007 we hosted our second Public 
Health Fair, a free event to promote health and well-being 
through fim activities and information sharing. Over 40 
area organizations and businesses attended the fair and 
provided residents with information about the services they 
provide, and how to live a healthier life. 

■ Population Served: All residents of Dorchester 

■ Staff Time: Approximately .25 FTE over the 



-87- 



course of 6 months of planning 

■ Funding Sources: Donation of materials from area 
businesses and some financial support from APD 
and the Tobacco Prevention and Control Program. 
MVHI would like to host this event every other 
year. However, for fiscal year 2009 there is no 
funding. 

• Service: Emergency Preparedness 

o MVHI continues to coordinate the Upper Valley All 

Health Hazards Planning Region 4, which includes the five 
Mascoma Valley towns and eight others in both Grafton 
and Sullivan Counties. The goal of the AHHR is to prepare 
the region for public health emergencies such as food 
borne outbreaks and pandemic influenza by networking 
with community members, regional hospitals, schools 
and towns, developing Memoranda of Understanding and 
holding exercises to practice for mass vaccination. Current 
efforts are focusing on educating the public on how to 
prepare for public health emergencies by attending local 
farmer's markets, including the Canaan & Enfield Farmer's 
Markets, school open houses, and Grafton and Dorchester 
Old Home Days. In addition to writing the regional Public 
Health Emergency Preparedness Response Plan, MVHI has 
collaborated with each of our five towns in writing their 
Local Emergency Operation Plans (LEOP), as well as the 
Canaan Point of Dispensing (POD) Plan, which includes 
the five towns of the Mascoma Valley. 

■ Population Served: All residents of Dorchester 

■ Staff Time: Approximately 1.25 FTE 

■ Funding Sources: NH DHHS and CDC grants, as 
well as funding from municipalities for assistance 
with the development of LEOP. 

Contact Information: 
P.O. Box 102 

1192 Route 4 E-5 Main Street 
Canaan, NH 03741 



TRI-COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION 
PROGRAM Inc. 

Serving Coos, Carroll & Grafton Counties 



30 Exchange Street, Berlin, N.H 03570 • (603) 752-7001 • Toll Free: 1-800-552-4617 
_\ Website: http://www.tccap.org • E-mail: admin@tccap.org 

\ Executive Director Lawrence M. Kelly 



Fax: (603) 752-7607 



CAP Community Contact Office 

258 Highland Street 

Plymouth, NH 03264 

Phone: 536-8222 ~ FAX: 536-4742 

Tri-County Community Action Program is a private, non-profit 
agency that provides Fuel Assistance, Weatherization Homeless 
Funds, and State-Wide Electric Assistance Program for the less 
fortunate citizens in your town and surrounding vicinities. C A.P 
depends upon funding from your town and others countywide, to 
enable us to continue our services. 
Very truly yours, 
Amanda Perreault 
Plymouth Community Contact Coordinator 



The following is a report of services provided in fiscal year 2007-2008: 




Services Provided: 


# of HH 


Dollar Amount 


Fuel Assistance Includes 1 Emergency 


20 


$13,770.00 


Weatherization 


1 


$1,949.00 


Homeless Funds (Rental, energy assistance, furnace clngs) 





SO.OO 


State- Wide Electric Assistance Program 


16 


$7,232.00 



THROUGH THE EFFORTS OF 

TRI-COUNTY COIVIIVIUNITY ACTION, THE 

CITIZENS OF DORCHESTER HAVE RECEIVED 

A TOTAL OF 

$22,951.00 

between July 1, 2007 and June 30, 2008 



-89- 



YEAR 2008 COMMUNITY CONTACT 
REPORT 

Community Contact is the field service arm of the 
Tri-County Community Action Program. The purpose 
of this program is to assist low-income, elderly, and 
handicapped persons to solve individual problems and 
to meet their needs through individual and/or group self 
help efforts. C.A.P. staff accomplished this purpose by 
providing information, counseling and by effectively 
linking and utilizing community resources. If possible, 
we also may assist with Emergency Fund dollars in the 
form of vouchers. 



CATEGORY 




TYPE OF ASSISTANCE 




SERVICE 
UNITS 








1. FOOD/HOUSING 




Emergency food pantry/Food Stamp 
referrals, Emer. Housing/Sec. Dep. Loans, 
TenantAandlord relations. Landlord lists 




2 


' ENERGY 


Elec. Disconnects, Fuel outages. Home 
repairs, Weatherization, Fuel wood. Heat 
source repair requests. Furnace issues 


62 


' HOMELESS 


Assistance to the homeless or those in 
imminent danger of being homeless 


4 


' INCOME/BUDGET 
COUNSELING 


Employment/job training refeiTals, Debt 
&/or money management, financial plan 
reviews. Welfare referrals 


5 


^ HEALTH ISSUES 


Medicare/Medicaid info/referrals. Mental 
health. Dental, Substance abuse, Emer. 
Response Units, Breast cancer awareness. 


6 


^ TRANSPORTATION 


Area public transportation info, car pool 
info. Information re: Senior transportation 
for medical and other needs 


1 


' OTHER ISSUES 


Clothing Vouchers, Domestic Violence 
Program referrals, Legal Aide referrals. 
Children's Hat & Minen Program 


3 



TOTAL SERVICE UNITS; 



-90- 



GRAFTON COUNTY SENIOR 
CITIZENS COUNCIL, INC. 

ANNUAL REPORT 2008 

Grafton County Senior Citizens Council, Inc. is a private 
nonprofit organization that provides programs and services 
to support the health and well being of our older citizens. 
The Council's programs enable elderly individuals to remain 
independent in their own homes and communities for as long as 
possible. 

The Council operates eight senior centers in Plymouth, Littleton, 
Canaan, Lebanon, Bristol, Orford, Haverhill and Lincoln, 
the information and assistance program Grafton County 
ServiceLink, and the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program and 
Volunteer Center (RSVP). Through the center, ServiceLink 
and RSVP, older adults and their families take part in a range of 
community-based long-term services including home delivered 
meals, congregate dining programs, transportation, elder 
care, chore/home repair services, recreational and educational 
programs, and volunteer opportunities. 

During 2008, 20 older residents of Dorchester were served 
by one or more of the Council's programs offered through the 
Plymouth Regional Senior Center or the Mascoma Area Senior 
Center: 

• Older adults from Dorchester enjoyed 107 balanced 
meals in the company of friends in the center's dining 
room. 

• They received 225 hot, nourishing meals delivered to 
their homes by caring volunteers. 

• They benefited fi-om one-on-one assistance in their home 
through 152.5 hours of adult in-home care and 12 hours 



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of assistance at the center through the licensed adult 
group day care program. 

• They received assistance with problems, crises or issues 
of long-term care through 118 visits with a trained 
outreach worker and 13 contacts with ServiceLink. 

• Dorchester's citizens also volunteered to put their talents 
and skills to work for a better community through 109 
hours of volunteer service. 

The cost to provide Council services for Dorchester 
Residents in 2008 was $9,714.31. 

Such services can be critical to elderly individuals who want 
to remain in their own homes and out of institutional care 
in spite of chronic health problems and increasing physical 
frailty, saving tax dollars that would otherwise be expended 
for nursing home care. They also contribute to a higher 
quality of life for our older friends and neighbors. As our 
population grows older, supportive services such as those 
offered by the council become even for critical. 

Grafton County Senior Citizens Council very much 
appreciates Dorchester's support for our programs that 
enhance the independence and dignity of older citizens and 
enable them to meet the challenges of aging in the security 
and comfort of their own communities and homes. 

Roberta Bemer, Executive Director 

Mascoma Area Senior Center 

(Canaan 523-4333) 

Plymouth Regional Senior Center 

(Plymouth 536-1204) 



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DORCHESTER fflSTORIC DISTRICT 
COMMISSION 

The Dorchester Historic District Commission met on three 
separate occasions during the past year. The first meeting, 
held on April 1, 2008, was called in order to discuss and act 
upon the driveway permit that had been submitted to the 
Dorchester Board of Selectmen by residents whose home is in 
the District. After a great deal of deliberation, the 
Commission voted to request that the Selectmen deny the 
permit on the following grounds: that the application 
contained faulty information and that it failed to meet three 
important requirements of the Dorchester Historic District 
Commission Ordinance. 

On July 21, 2008 the Commission met in order to discuss and 
act upon the Application for Certification of Approval 
submitted by the Dorchester Board of Selectmen for replacing 
the front doors of the Town Hall. After viewing the plans 
submitted by Selectman John Cote and looking at the doors in 
place at that time, a motion was made to accept the design 
presented for the replacement doors. It was understood at that 
time that the old latches would be used. Subsequently, due to 
poor workmanship and materials as well as to doorknobs 
having been substituted for the original latches, the doors 
were not deemed satisfactory by the Selectmen and will need 
to be replaced by a more fitting construction after the winter 
months. 

A third meeting was held on September 30, 2008 in order to 
discuss and act upon the Application for Certification of 
Approval submitted by Cynthia Cummings and Paul Dunne, 
both teachers who were representing the Indian River School. 
Artist Emile Birch, Ms. Cummings' husband, was also 
present at that meeting, as he will be assisting the students in 



the project during the school year. The apphcation was for a 
representation of the planet Pluto to be installed near the 
Museum on the Town Common as part of a project whereby 
similar representations of other parts of the solar system 
would be installed in each of the five towns in the Mascoma 
Valley Regional School District. An additional aspect of the 
project was that the site would be part of Valley Quest and 
would likely draw in visitors from other areas. The 
Commission welcomed and approved the application, with 
certain strictures having been added concerning colors to be 
used on the monument and its placement, which, it was 
decided, should be somewhat unobtrusive. On October 25 
several volunteers dug the hole in the approved site and then 
filled it with sand so that the sculpture could be put in place in 
the spring of 2009. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Patricia E. Franz, Chairman 
Dorchester Historic District Commission 



Visiting Nurse Association & Hospice 

OF VT AND NH 

Home Healthcare, Hospice and Maternal Child 
Health Services in the Town of Dorchester 

The VNA & Hospice is a compassionate, no-profit healthcare 
organization committed to providing the highest quaUty home 
healthcare and hospice support services to individuals and their 
families. By keeping Dorchester residents out of emergency 
rooms and hospitals, and reducing the need for relocation to 
nursing homes, our care offers significant savings in the town's 
emergency services and other medical expenses. 

VNA & Hospice clients are of all ages and at all stages in 
life. Services are provided to all in need regardless of ability 
to pay. Between July 1, 2007 and June 30, 2008, the VNA & 
Hospice made 20 1 homecare visits to 1 5 Dorchester residents 
(unduplicated) and provided approximately $10,631 in 
uncompensated care. 

Home Health Care: 153 home visits to 13 residents with short- 
term medical or physical needs 

Lon^-term Care: 1 home visit to 1 resident with chronic 
medical problems who needed extended care in their home to 
avoid admission to a nursing home. 

Hospice Services: 47 home visits to 1 resident who was in the 
final stages of their life. 

Family Support Services: 1 family was visited for parenting 
and child development support. 



-93- 



Additionally, residents made visits to VNA & Hospice meet the 
demand for quality home healthcare, and to ensure that all who 
qualify for services will always be able to receive them. On 
behalf of the people we serve, we thank you for your continued 
support. 

Sincerely, 

Jeanne McLaughlin, 

President 




-94- 



VITAL STATISTICS 

DORCHESTER, N.H. 





Name 



Date 



Maxine Poitras 02-24-08 



DEATHS 

Place 

Dorchester, NH 



David Carter 06-02-08 Plymouth, NH 



Ian Taliaferro 07-24-08 Dorchester, NH 



MMMMMMMM 



Parents 

Albert Conkey Sr. 
Irene Avery 

James Carter 
Nettie Sails 

Richard Taliaferro 
Luann Moulton 



Date 

06-21-08 



MARRIAGES 

Groom/Bride 

Chris A. Lemay 
Margaret E. Currier 



Residence 

Dorchester, NH 
Dorchester, NH 



06-28-08 



08-02-08 



James L. Rhodes 
Andrea T. Lecuyer 

Nathaniel T. Harrison 
Sarah L. Holmes 



Dorchester, NH 
Dorchester, NH 

Dorchester, NH 
Dorchester, NH 



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Place 



Date 



BIRTHS 

Name 



Lebanon, NH 1 0-3 1 -08 Bates, Maliky Joffre 



Parents 

Adam Bates 
Deborah Bates 



-95- 



- Notes - 



-96- 



INDEX 

Animal Control Officer's Report 70-71 

Auditors' Report 29 

Capital Reserve Funds 72 

Cemetery Committee 30-31 

Community Contract Report 90 

Compensation/Benefits Committee Report 10-14 

Dedication - Henry "Hank" Melanson 2 

Detailed Report of Payments 32-39 

Detailed Summary of Receipts 24 

Dorchester Grange 3 

Dorchester Town Budget 19-21 

Dorchester Town Officers 15-16 

Emergency Numbers Back Cover 

Financial Report 26 

Forest Fire Warden 82-83 

Mascoma Valley Health Initiative 84-88 

Meeting Times & Hours 16 

Pemi-Baker Solid Waste District 76-79 

Planning Board 49-69 

Raymond S. Burton Councilor, District One 80-81 

Road Agent's Report 45-48 

Roads Money Distribution 40-44 

Schedule of Town Property 25 

Selectmen's Report. 4-9 

Senior Citizens Council 91-92 

Sources of Revenue 22-23 

Summary of Valuation 25 

Tax Collector's Report 28 

Taxes Assessed and Tax Rate 25 

Town Clerk's Report 29 

Town Warrant 17-18 

Treasurer's Report ^.. 27 

Tri-County Community Action Program 89 

Trust Funds 73 

Upper Valley Lake Sunapee Regional Planning Commission 74-75 

Visiting Nurse Association & Hospice 93-94 

Vital Statistics 95 




v^^5Ki'.^<::=^«csv^=2^«e2Vi=^sesv^2^seiv^ 



EMERGENCY NUMBERS | 



IN ANY EMERGENCY, 
PLEASE CALL 



911 



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CANAAN FJV.S.T SQUAD 
WARREN-WENTWORTH AMBULANCE 

SERVICE 
POLICE: State Police ~ 1-800-52-5555 

State Police ~ (Troop F)271-l 170 
Grafton County Sheriffs Dept. 1-800-552-0393 

Dorchester Highwaj Department 

786-2385 



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